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Letti
01-06-2008, 01:25 PM
We should have opened this thread long time ago.
I do love this book and I loved every single page of it. I found it deep and exciting but I can understand those who find it boring.

Your favourite parts?

Brice
01-06-2008, 01:33 PM
I think my favorite part is the whole part talking about the infinitesmal purple blade of grass and the worlds inside of worlds.

Letti
01-06-2008, 01:41 PM
I think my favorite part is the whole part talking about the infinitesmal purple blade of grass and the worlds inside of worlds.

I will have to reread that part. It was such a long time ago. :)

Brice
01-06-2008, 01:55 PM
I think my favorite part is the whole part talking about the infinitesmal purple blade of grass and the worlds inside of worlds.

I will have to reread that part. It was such a long time ago. :)

I just randomly pick the book up and reread that part alot.

TerribleT
01-06-2008, 03:06 PM
I think my favorite part is the whole part talking about the infinitesmal purple blade of grass and the worlds inside of worlds.

That and the whole concept of size.

TerribleT
01-06-2008, 03:08 PM
I think my favorite parts of the book are the stories of Gilead. In particular the story of Roland's test. The moment where he kicks down Cort's door and challenges him is awesome. I love the stories of their training, and learning of Alain and Cuthbert.

alinda
01-06-2008, 03:12 PM
I am stunned !
Brice this is by far one of my favorite bits too.
You see all my life my MOTHER has informed anyone
who would listen that I am purple, and all of my life
purple has haunted me. I tell you it follows
me around. To make a long confusing story shorter
and just plain crazy sounding, I found this part
of the tale to me personal in a sense. WOW!

Letti
01-06-2008, 03:25 PM
I loved the whole book so much that it's hard to choose. I loved the parts you guys mentioned and I must add that I loved the part where Roland met the girl who worked in the pub. Allie - if I remember well.
His relationship with that girl was so... I don't know. Unique. Cold. But still touching.
The way they talked to each other... the way they tried to get something from the other... I loved it.

Wuducynn
01-07-2008, 06:56 AM
One of my favorite parts of this book is Roland finding Jake in the Waystation.

Jean
01-07-2008, 06:59 AM
Jake telling his story; Roland and Cuthbert present at Hax's hanging. I'm afraid that's about it. Well, two or three sentences of the palaver with Walter.

jayson
01-07-2008, 07:04 AM
I've always loved the vision that Walter shows Roland emphasizing that "size matters." It was certainly not the first time I came across the concept of a whole universe existing inside a smaller entity [there's always the stoner conversation between Pinto and Donald Sutherland in Animal House], but I enjoyed the way King wrote it. My other fav part was Roland's story of his manhood test. Right there I learned a lot of what I needed to know about Roland.:shoot:

Will Dearborn
01-15-2008, 02:47 PM
My favorite part is when Roland shoots don the town like dogs. It was a good way of explaining is drive for the tower and just what he will go through to find it. It was also a good way of showing just how much of a badass Roland is.

Matt
01-15-2008, 02:50 PM
Its weird, about Tull. I remember thinking the first time that Roland was a total monster. Really surprised I continued but of course, I had to.

After the many years in between then and now, I still think Roland is a monster and I love him for it.

childeluke
01-25-2008, 12:02 AM
I love when Roland takes mescaline and confronts the spirit in the stone circle. Next in line is the reanimation of the man who was chewing the devil grass.

Letti
01-25-2008, 12:14 AM
I loved Roland's little romance in Tull. It was cheap still nice somehow.

ManOfWesternesse
01-25-2008, 05:24 AM
Roland's testing. Very good.
Tull.
Brown & Zoltan (great scene).
Roland just before he gets to the waystation - he was all but dead on his feet - but still walking to the Tower.

Letti
01-26-2008, 12:51 AM
I will have to reread this book very soon. :) I miss it.

MonteGss
01-26-2008, 02:58 PM
Roland's test of manhood was the best for me.

Malficeus
01-26-2008, 07:16 PM
the beginning i mean come on thats the coolest line ever

the Man in Black fled across the desert and the Gunslinger followed

jayson
01-27-2008, 04:47 PM
It is one of the better opening lines I've read.

Storyslinger
01-28-2008, 11:38 AM
Roland's test of manhood was the best for me.

My fav, hands down.

But, the final vision was a close second.

Wuducynn
01-28-2008, 05:38 PM
Why Roland finding Jake in the Way Station was one of my favorite parts was because this is where it went from bizarre, dream-like quality of a western to outright, tingling-up-my-spine, mind-blowing implications.
I remember first reading it thinking to myself, how in the hell is a little kid from our world out in this waystation...and it got crazier from there.

Malficeus
01-28-2008, 06:02 PM
Why Roland finding Jake in the Way Station was one of my favorite parts was because this is where it went from bizarre, dream-like quality of a western to outright, tingling-up-my-spine, mind-blowing implications.
I remember first reading it thinking to myself, how in the hell is a little kid from our world out in this waystation...and it got crazier from there.

you know i forgot about i felt almost the same way.. when reading it i thought he went to future due to how roland kept thinking back on stuff we have : (e.g. the god Amaco worshiped at the gas pumps)

jayson
01-29-2008, 04:39 AM
Why Roland finding Jake in the Way Station was one of my favorite parts was because this is where it went from bizarre, dream-like quality of a western to outright, tingling-up-my-spine, mind-blowing implications.
I remember first reading it thinking to myself, how in the hell is a little kid from our world out in this waystation...and it got crazier from there.

that was my ultimate fantasy as a kid, to find myself in some other world that was part western/part fantasy sci-fi. i'd rather not have gotten there the way jake had to, but ultimately you gotta get there somehow.

MonteGss
01-29-2008, 08:28 AM
I'd die if I knew I'd end up with Roland and become a gunslinger. :)

Jean
01-30-2008, 01:14 AM
I'd die if I knew I'd end up with Roland and become a gunslinger. :)
hmm
I don't think those who treat their lives lightly can ever become gunslingers at all... they strike me as principally survivor types...

movieman19
02-04-2008, 02:14 AM
I have 2 favorite moments in the book. One is my favorite from my first readthough and the other is when I was reading the series the second time.

The first time I thought the ending was amazing. How he finally caught up to The Man In Black. The palavar that he had with Him was amazing. Knowing that it was a 7 book series I couldn't even begin to describe the thought process I had in digesting some of the stuff The Man In Black was saying. I loved it.

Now my favorite part in my second reading...


I remember first reading it thinking to myself, how in the hell is a little kid from our world out in this waystation...and it got crazier from there.

Exactly how I felt. When I got to that part again on the second readthrough I couldn't help but notice that that feeling was one I had all throughout the series. The feeling of unknown. Right then I realized that that feeling was one of the best feelings I had ever had while reading a fiction novel. The mystery of such a far fetched scenario was so enticing. Anything seemed possible at that point. anything

John_and_Yoko
04-03-2008, 12:32 PM
My favorite part was really the end, the palaver with Walter. I just loved the way he described the universe--that kind of topic has always fascinated me.

mia/susannah
04-03-2008, 12:44 PM
One of my favorite parts is where Roland meets up with Allie. His test for manhood as well, his meeting Jake in the Waystation and his palaver with Walter.

The Journeyman
04-22-2008, 07:04 PM
DTVII
The last two-hundred pages or so of the final novel. Such fantastic, epic writing on a description, plot and dialogue level. I loved everything. The description of the lingering cold, the walk to the tower, Susannah leaving him - everything.

Getting Eddie from the first door was a brilliant one, too.

John_and_Yoko
04-22-2008, 07:49 PM
Erm....

I think this is only for the first volume, not the series as a whole....

The Journeyman
04-22-2008, 08:24 PM
Oh.

In that case...the opening descriptions of the desert. Really brilliant scenery.

That and the palaver with Walter. Such fantastic writing yet again.

Wuducynn
04-22-2008, 08:42 PM
The Journeyman could you edit your original post with spoiler tags or delete it?

The Journeyman
04-22-2008, 08:47 PM
Done and done.

John_and_Yoko
04-22-2008, 09:58 PM
I'm confused....

I thought this was a spoiler thread (albeit one for this particular volume). Now it isn't?

Likewise, I can no longer find that thread about the top 5 non-Dark Tower books.... I was looking for it because so far Insomnia is my favorite one of those....

Letti
04-22-2008, 10:11 PM
I'm confused....

1. I thought this was a spoiler thread (albeit one for this particular volume). Now it isn't?

2. Likewise, I can no longer find that thread about the top 5 non-Dark Tower books.... I was looking for it because so far Insomnia is my favorite one of those....

1. Yeah, you can write about anything here that was in the first volume, you are right. But everything else is spoiler.

2. I think you are looking for this thread, sai: http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/showthread.php?t=426 :rose:


Journeyman, thank you for editing. I love the way you speak about the books. I absolutely agree.
King knows how to create a vivid world in your mind.

Matt
04-23-2008, 03:57 PM
This whole set of forums (named for the books) is supposed to represent the only "spoiler free" portion of the site.

So basically, if you read the forum for the first book (here)--you will find spoilers for the book only and not for the series itself. :grouphug:

John_and_Yoko
04-23-2008, 07:27 PM
2. I think you are looking for this thread, sai: http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/showthread.php?t=426 :rose:

Say thankya!

I was going out of my mind, I couldn't find the darned thing!

fernandito
04-23-2008, 07:29 PM
Favorite part?

(points to screen name) :D

Cha-ching!

The_Gunslinger
06-24-2008, 12:55 PM
When Roland and Jake are on their journey... And the encounter in Tull. It just really seems to set the mood of the series for me. Sacrifice... Dedication. All that.

The Lady of Shadows
06-24-2008, 07:38 PM
jake and roland meeting for the first time

jake telling his tale

jake's knowledge that the gunslinger is going to sacrifice him

jake. . .

okay, fine. jake. jake is the best part for me.


and the opening line of course. "The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed." how could you read that first line and not continue with the second, and the third, and the fourth. . . .

Girlystevedave
07-01-2008, 11:36 AM
I have to say that the passage about the blade of grass and the size of the universe is my favorite. (I'm with Brice: I pick up the book at random moments just to read that part)
Another one of my favorites is when Roland hypnotizes Jake and he begins to tell his story of a 'big city..a statue in the water'. I remember when I read that for the first time, I thought: "Oh man..where the f*ck is this story about to take me?" :excited:

And to be honest, I love every part of this story. It's funny that when I first read it, I was a little unsure about it. Now, it has become the story that I have read countless times, and each time, I love it even more.

Matticus-Finch
07-11-2008, 08:47 AM
The Palaver with Walter at the Golgotha. The entire book led up to this 'confrontation' and it was captivating! I was salivating for The Drawing of The Three when I was finished.

BillyxRansom
08-18-2008, 04:44 PM
I think my favorite parts of the book are the stories of Gilead. In particular the story of Roland's test. The moment where he kicks down Cort's door and challenges him is awesome. I love the stories of their training, and learning of Alain and Cuthbert.

Yup.

LadyHitchhiker
10-18-2008, 12:53 PM
When Roland enters the bar in Tull and says "How they hanging? You dudes live in town?" I laughed hysterically now having read the books a few times. Is this normal for the slingers to run around and how "how they hanging"? Perhaps it means something different in this timeline and this world...

And then I also loved when he said, "I'm grateful. It's good to know someone in this town is bright enough to talk." When I first read it, I thought he was really just talking out of his heart, but now that I have gotten to know Roland's character a little better, I actually think this is showing some of his sense of humor!

Whitey Appleseed
12-22-2008, 05:46 PM
When Roland enters the bar in Tull and says "How they hanging? You dudes live in town?" I laughed hysterically now having read the books a few times. Is this normal for the slingers to run around and how "how they hanging"? Perhaps it means something different in this timeline and this world...

And then I also loved when he said, "I'm grateful. It's good to know someone in this town is bright enough to talk." When I first read it, I thought he was really just talking out of his heart, but now that I have gotten to know Roland's character a little better, I actually think this is showing some of his sense of humor!

I said something about this elsewhere, LadyHitchhiker, but yeah, when I read those lines you quote, it threw me cause I'd read The Gunslinger first in the revised and expanded version. Those lines are changed in that version to read, Long days and pleasant nights. for the first, and you fellas live in town?for the second. So reading the original for the first time and hearing Roland speak those lines is startling. I've read the whole series several times, 3, 4, ?, so I already had this image of Roland.

Every time I read the words, long days and pleasant nights, I'm going to hear, how they hanging...imagine being at some kind of Dark Tower get together and having people come up, chat, long days et cetera, and you start cackling like a madman. I figure to equip with Kleenex, you know, for accidents.

Ruthful
12-26-2008, 05:45 PM
Hax's hanging, Zoltan and Brown, the obliteration of Tull, anything involving a memory of Cort-especially Roland's final test-and the palaver between Roland and Walter at the conclusion of the book.

Don't forget the slow muties! I love it whenever they appear in any novel or short story written by Stephen King.

mate211
12-30-2008, 07:05 AM
My favourite moment was that,when Roland catch Walter ,that was very interest.
http://sk.fps-hq.hu/pics/books/dt1.jpg
Here a pic from my book:D

Letti
12-30-2008, 07:22 AM
hey, it's the Hungarian cover :)

*edit
I have just seen you are from Hungary.

mate211
12-30-2008, 07:27 AM
yeah:Dthe hungarian translation is the best:D(ok the original is good too:D)

Letti
12-30-2008, 07:42 AM
yeah:Dthe hungarian translation is the best:D(ok the original is good too:D)

For my part I prefer the original.

MonteGss
12-30-2008, 07:43 PM
I just finished the Muller reading of the Original today. It was the first time I heard that version. I really wish he could have done the Revised edition!

My favorite part continues to be Roland's test of manhood and the events preceeding it. :thumbsup:

Ste Letto
02-18-2009, 02:01 PM
Many great moments there,

for me, my favourite is hearing the drunken singing of a modified "Hey Jude" as Roland approaches Tull.

dotKay
03-30-2009, 05:54 PM
I loved the whole palaver at the end.
And i have to say that i find this line epic:

Allie: "You have to have it, don't you? You couldn't just throw me a fuck and go to sleep"

:P

sleeplessdwarf
03-30-2009, 06:16 PM
Tull

Woofer
04-02-2009, 06:07 AM
Tull

Meanwhile back in Dark Tower one.
When Roland belonged to no one.
He didn't stand a chance, son.
If his life stayed undone.

DoctorDodge
04-03-2009, 10:33 AM
One moment that sticks out in my head is Jake's story. Before the introduction of Jake, The Gunslinger could've been just a very strange Western, but it was when Jake told his story that we got our first good glimpse that something much bigger was going on.

Or maybe i just like Jake's story because i can easily imagine Life on Mars? by David Bowie playing in my head when he arrives in Mid-World! :lol:

AlishaRiley
04-03-2009, 05:09 PM
I loved Tull...absolutely loved it. Allie was especially fascinating to me - her relationship with Roland was just absorbing.
I also wholly enjoyed Roland's conversation with Walter - not as much in its entirity, mainly the discussion about worlds within worlds. It's something that's really stuck with me, and I find myself thinking about it an awful lot. It's such an awesome, mind-boggling concept. :wub:

wlackey2
04-03-2009, 05:34 PM
I was rather fond of Roland cleaving through the residents of Tull. I could almost hear the Ennio Morricone music playing in my head as Roland took out the whole town (Morricone did the music for the Clint Eastwood "Man with No Name" movies). :cowboy:

The sequence where Jake and Roland part company kinda reached out and grabbed me the first time I read it, too...! :cry:

Wayne

Toolwars
06-12-2009, 09:18 AM
Go then, there are other worlds than these'- Jake Chambers

The defining moment in the series in my view....If you didn't feel Roland's obsession at that moment then you might as well have quit reading right there

Letti
06-15-2009, 12:07 PM
Go then, there are other worlds than these'- Jake Chambers

The defining moment in the series in my view....If you didn't feel Roland's obsession at that moment then you might as well have quit reading right there

I guess those people are not members here. ;)
Welcome to the site.

BillyxRansom
06-19-2009, 02:16 PM
In other words, where does the magic lie? What is it about this particular book that makes it so amazing?

For me, it is the prose, the style, just the way it is written. I understand King himself said the reason he re-wrote the book is because the original version sounded too important (or something along those lines), but I think the way it is written in that first version is something very special.

What is it for you? Is it the plot? The way the events happen? Is it the characters? I think another big part of it, is the interaction between the characters. (Although I must admit, I was pretty annoyed by Jake for a while.)

So, what was it? :)

Letti
06-19-2009, 10:38 PM
Huh, hard question. I wouldn't like to go on and on (I could for hours) so let me sum up my answer in one word: Roland

ola
06-19-2009, 10:48 PM
Yes I've got to say that the first introduction to Roland is a big part of what makes this book special. It includes short glimpses of all the other things that get fleshed out more in the other books - Roland + Jake, encounters with the Man in Black, and stories of his younger years.

IMO you can also feel that King is tumbling headlong into this series, and feeling around - exploring these things spontaneously. Like when you hear a piece of music that you can tell was done with a certain energy, all in one take.

candy
06-20-2009, 10:22 AM
i gotta say that first line got me. but then after that it was the fact that king had ventured out of his comfort zone of castle rock and the surrounding areas, i loved that he was doing something different.

in regards to the style of writing, i agree with billyx, i prefer the unrevised version, although that may have a lot to do with me reading that version first.

for me the time i really got into it though was when jake was introduced. i loved jake and felt he added an extra (missing??) dimension to the book

BillyxRansom
06-29-2009, 02:42 PM
Huh, hard question. I wouldn't like to go on and on (I could for hours) so let me sum up my answer in one word: Roland

Roland, for me, was SO DAMN INTENSE! It was like he knew what he wanted, would stop at nothing, but turned out to be so very, very wrong.

Makes me really sad for him. :cry:

LadyHitchhiker
06-29-2009, 03:34 PM
"In other words, where does the magic lie? What is it about this particular book that makes it so amazing?"

Beans beans the musical fruit... :rock:
And the Beatles...

Venom09
07-10-2009, 05:30 PM
The first time I read it I can say it was the mystery of the whole plot and the pace at which the questons you were asking yourself were answered. On each subsequent time through the book you just realize how great of a begining it is to the story.

BillyxRansom
07-18-2009, 07:04 AM
The first time I read it I can say it was the mystery of the whole plot and the pace at which the questons you were asking yourself were answered. On each subsequent time through the book you just realize how great of a begining it is to the story.

This really comes close to capturing the true essence of it in full, I think. Maybe not nearly close enough to completely capturing it, but closer than I've ever been able to come thus far.

Huh.

erikeliotwrites
07-23-2009, 10:38 AM
My favorite part is when Roland shoots don the town like dogs. It was a good way of explaining is drive for the tower and just what he will go through to find it. It was also a good way of showing just how much of a badass Roland is.

man that scene was hella intense---just goes to show how badass Roland is :rose:

the whole scene regarding the purple grass, i really cannont remember it; page number anyone??

pixiedark76
07-23-2009, 12:54 PM
This may sound cold, but my favorite part was when Roland let Jake "drop" off the bridge and Jake said "Go then there are other worlds than this." After "The man in black fled across the desert and the gunslinger followed" this quote is the second most memorable from the series.
My second favorite part of this book was when Roland shot up the town of Tull.

Letti
07-23-2009, 01:23 PM
It doesn't sound cold at all. Many people love that quote a lot. It's really meaningful. And the more you read the series the more important it seems to be.

erikeliotwrites
07-25-2009, 10:51 AM
This may sound cold, but my favorite part was when Roland let Jake "drop" off the bridge and Jake said "Go then there are other worlds than this." After "The man in black fled across the desert and the gunslinger followed" this quote is the second most memorable from the series.
My second favorite part of this book was when Roland shot up the town of Tull.

yeah i totally agree with your selections--i really enjoyed when Roland let Jake fall--as horrible as it may sounds, i can feel Jakes resentment or perhaps skepticism towards Roland from "The Drawing of the Three" and the following books--just really intense.

And when Rolands lights up the city of Tull---pure badass-ness :pirate:

Sandalwood Grips
08-09-2009, 10:19 PM
I was rather fond of Roland cleaving through the residents of Tull. I could almost hear the Ennio Morricone music playing in my head as Roland took out the whole town (Morricone did the music for the Clint Eastwood "Man with No Name" movies). :cowboy:

The sequence where Jake and Roland part company kinda reached out and grabbed me the first time I read it, too...! :cry:

Wayne

Rereading The Gunslinger today, my roommate was watching TGTB&TU...it gave new life to scenes that I've read over and over again...if the film does get adapted, I hope whomever scores it takes some heavy influence from Morricone.

BROWNINGS CHILDE
08-10-2009, 12:29 AM
Go then, there are other worlds than these'- Jake Chambers

The defining moment in the series in my view....If you didn't feel Roland's obsession at that moment then you might as well have quit reading right there

I think this was my favorite part two, because it hinted to how enormous the scope of the tale would be.

keyframe
08-28-2009, 08:52 PM
My favorite part by far:

The boy saluted formally. "Teach me no more, bondsman. Today i teach you."

A few pages later...

"Have you come here for a serious purpose, boy?"
"I have come for a serious purpose."
"Have you come as an outcast from your father's house?"
"I have come so." And would remain outcast until he had bested Cort. If Cort bested him, he would remain outcast forever.
"Have you come with your chosen weapon?"
"I have."
"What is your weapon?" This was the teacher's advantage, his chance to adjust his plan of battle to the sling or spear or bah or bow.
"My weapon is David."
Cort halted only briefly. He was surprised, and very likely confused. That was good.

CrimsonMordred
01-29-2010, 06:35 PM
The massacre of Tull. And also his scene with The Man in Black.

Dan-Tete
03-31-2010, 05:26 AM
My favorite part is when Roland shoots don the town like dogs. It was a good way of explaining is drive for the tower and just what he will go through to find it. It was also a good way of showing just how much of a badass Roland is.

I also love this part. The way King describes how fast Roland can reload his guns, whilst still running, moving, he doesn't even have to pause.

Delacroix
04-01-2010, 12:34 PM
Yeah, this is what a gunslinger is made of! In Tull Roland gives off a real feeling of might.

But my favorite part is when Jake says that Roland is going to kill him, and Roland avoids the subject. You know it's going to happen, but there is no other choice for Jake. That's so terrible but so good.

I also love the Man in Black.

Syncrosonix
04-21-2010, 06:35 AM
i read it over a decade ago and most of the book has been somewhat forgotten. i don't remember much but i do remember something about roland wiping out an entire town. i liked that quite a bit. unfortunately i don't remember the reason why he did it.

Delacroix
04-25-2010, 01:16 PM
Maybe it's a good reason to read it again!

Letti
05-05-2010, 06:27 AM
i read it over a decade ago and most of the book has been somewhat forgotten. i don't remember much but i do remember something about roland wiping out an entire town. i liked that quite a bit. unfortunately i don't remember the reason why he did it.
:shocked: Um.. well..

Charyou Tree
06-05-2010, 07:28 AM
I just finished the Muller reading of the Original today. It was the first time I heard that version. I really wish he could have done the Revised edition!


Indeed....listen to him doing The Talisman......wow....:rose:

Silentmist
06-22-2010, 11:48 PM
This book was recommended to me in 2001 by a very good friend. I was mildly interested with Roland's time in Tull, but over all I was kind of bored with the book in general. I think King's writing style was turning me off in the beginning but I never put down a book before I read the entire thing.

Once I got to the end, where he and Walter have their "conversation" I was hooked, I've never had one part of a book turn me around almost instantly. I couldn't wait to get to the second book, and re-read the first. It changed my entire view on the book, and has become one of my favorite books. So I'd have to say his conversation with Walter was by far and away my favorite part of the book. :rose:

killboi
07-04-2010, 06:14 AM
An awesome first novel which was the main reason i got myself involved in this series. I love the beginning sequence in which Roland and his journey is described perfectly capturing the essence of the series. My fav scene is the one in which roland meets brown and i couldn't tell i how much i got excited when i read in graphic novel format.
And the next best one got to be the finale - Palaver....I'm not sure if i would have returned to the series without that scene. It made me WANT to find the dark tower just like roland. It just got be obsessed with the tower...

Doe
10-31-2010, 06:37 AM
My fravorite part had to be when Roland killed the town (Cry pardon, i forgot the name) I could just see that in my head, him dancing backwards ducking and weaving around the projectiles as he reloads and fans the hammer at the oncoming horde of villagers...

haunted.lunchbox
10-31-2010, 07:19 AM
I love the parts that talk about the slow mutants and the by products of civilizations past. This actually makes a lot of sense because I am fascinated with chernobyl.

If I had to pick a particular scene though... Tull and it's downfall. Roland was fierce.

blavigne
11-13-2010, 07:53 AM
I always want to go back to the test with Cort. To me that is such a powerful and moving scene. I love the end of that where Cort tells Roland to wait "let the word and the legend go before you"

Boots
01-12-2011, 05:42 AM
I've read this book twice: the original and the revised edition (more on that later). Sometimes I think it's a disjointed, warbling mess (thank God it's short). The first time I read it, it did nothing for me at all. But it grows on you, particularly once you move forward into book two.

Others have expressed these sentiments and I agree: the harrowing in Tull makes the book and makes Roland (in the "now"). He's unflinching in his quest. That said, Jake's line "There are other worlds than these" makes the series ~ without it and without Roland's conscience trailing after it, this wouldn't be going anywhere any more interesting than a shoot-em up video game.

When I recommend these books to others, I tell them to read book one and two as a single entity (The Gunslinger being a prologue for the series). While there are other nice moments in book one, I think it really needs book two to feel whole.

Serpent Raptor
01-14-2011, 06:47 AM
The Gunslinger had a great atmosphere, but the later books are far more exciting. I see the Gunslinger more as a prologue to the series than a first chapter (as also said by boots) lol, my favourite bits have already been said by others on this thread, but I'll say em anyway:

Meeting Jake. Cos hes just awesome, lol. "I don't like people. They fuck me up." EPIC quote.

The palavar with Walter DEFO. Walter explaining how humans can't comprehend size and we can't know how many universes there are, etc. The blade of grass analogy was cool. Ok, the whole talk was cool! I've always been really interested in that sort of topic, so it was pretty uber reading about it by Stephen King.

I thought I was the only one who kept picking the book back up just to read that bit, but apparently not, lol.

ka-tetcast
10-01-2014, 11:45 PM
The bloodbath at Tull - absolutely epic!

But a very close second is the idea of a honky tonk version of "Hey Jude" playing on the piano in the background at Sheb's. It's a very evocative image for me.

Ross
04-20-2015, 10:54 AM
I think my favourite part is when he bests Cort with his bird. That and of course when he kills everyone in town. I just finished Wizard and Glass and because I am waiting to get Wind through the keyhole delivered I am re-reading The Gunslinger again. I think that I will get a little more insight into it now that I know more about his past going into this book. I have a feeling I will be reading this series at least 2 or 3 more times before I move on to another book.

Father Cody
02-28-2018, 06:11 PM
ďThe greatest mystery the universe offers is not life but size.ď

Then the discussion that follows. Itís like Stephen King perfectly explained what Iíve teetered on exploring and accepting in my life in terms of spirituality and just what in the hell is going around me as a living being. It was the first book I had read by King and one of the first books Iíd ever read for pleasure. I was hooked right there. I wanted to and still want to read everything the man has written for even a slight chance that Iíll experience something like that again. It was a genuine epiphany in the most literal sense of the word.

Girlystevedave
03-01-2018, 09:20 AM
ďThe greatest mystery the universe offers is not life but size.ď

Then the discussion that follows. Itís like Stephen King perfectly explained what Iíve teetered on exploring and accepting in my life in terms of spirituality and just what in the hell is going around me as a living being.

Yes.
The explanation of the universe in that part of the book is one of my favorite things ever for the reasons you mentioned.