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  1. #26
    Gunslinger Daghain is on a distinguished road Daghain's Avatar

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    Haven't read them, but the name's familiar. They've used excerpts from his books on Crime Library, I'll bet.

    Wow. Just what I need. More books to read.

    ETA: And what the hell is so fascinating about Crime Library anyway? I swear I can waste hours on there.



    "People, especially children, aren't measured by their IQ. What's important about them is whether they're good or bad, and these children are bad." ~ Alan Bernard


    "You needn't die happy when your day comes, but you must die satisfied, for you have lived your life from beginning to end and ka is always served." ~ Roland Deschain

  2. #27
    Rabid Billybumbler Ruthful is on a distinguished road Ruthful's Avatar

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    You've got to read Carlo! He's absolutely brilliant.

    He has this faux philosophical, by way of Bensonhurst, tone that can be annoying at times, but his books are absolutely compelling! You'll probably finish them in a matter of weeks, even though all of them are over four hundred pages-long.

    The funny thing about Carlo is that he has an enormous ego. I was speaking with a co-worker whose full-time job involves contracting, and who hired a landscaping firm to do over his house. When he asked Carlo what he did for a living, he was given a look of complete incredulity. Then Carlo declared, in a very condescending manner, "I'M A FAMOUS WRITER!"

  3. #28
    Gunslinger Daghain is on a distinguished road Daghain's Avatar

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    That's hilarious!



    "People, especially children, aren't measured by their IQ. What's important about them is whether they're good or bad, and these children are bad." ~ Alan Bernard


    "You needn't die happy when your day comes, but you must die satisfied, for you have lived your life from beginning to end and ka is always served." ~ Roland Deschain

  4. #29
    Rabid Billybumbler Ruthful is on a distinguished road Ruthful's Avatar

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    The funny thing is that, in a sense, he's correct. His books are best-sellers, they've been adapted into extremely popular cable TV documentaries, and he's, in all likelihood, very rich because of his work. But anyone who wasn't familiar with him probably wouldn't recognize him on the street, or be able to pick his name from a hat filled with the names of other popular non-fiction authors. I mean, it's not like the guy is Tom Clancy or Toni Morrison.

  5. #30
    Rabid Billybumbler Ruthful is on a distinguished road Ruthful's Avatar

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    Another great book you should think about reading, especially if you're interested in the beginnings of the American mafia:

    [ame="http://www.amazon.co.uk/American-Mafia-History-Rise-Power/dp/0805077987/ref=pd_sim_b_5/276-8216505-8381819"]American Mafia: A History of Its Rise to Power: Thomas A. Reppetto: Amazon.co.uk: Books[/ame]

  6. #31
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae's Avatar

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    Richard J. Evans, the great historian of Nazi Germany, is coming out with a new book in November on pre-WW1 Europe. Should be facinating. If you haven't read his Third Reich Trilogy, check out the first post of this thread.


  7. #32
    Maerlyn's Imp St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy's Avatar

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    Pablo-

    I've just discovered this thread and I see you have (or at least had) the box set SE of Evans' Third Reich trilogy. How is it production/appearance-wise? It was long gone (from the publisher) by the time I'd learned of its existence and I've only seen it for sale twice (I'll admit, I haven't looked that hard) - once for about $150 (manageable) and once for $1,300 (whoa, Nellie).
    Find out what words mean before you talk, and only join conversations you understand. Thank you.

  8. #33
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae's Avatar

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    I do have the set and it's beautiful. The pages are of heavier stock and they're nicely bound with a good old-school feel. I'm amazed at the prices it's been going for the last few years. I was worried I overpaid when I got it for less than $100 shipped from the UK. But it is worth it if you can snag one for $150. The books are amazing as is the content. Evans on his site mentions he's got plans to also do a history of post-war Germany from 1945 to reunification in 1991. That should be another amazing book.

  9. #34
    Maerlyn's Imp St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy's Avatar

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    good to know; thanks.
    Find out what words mean before you talk, and only join conversations you understand. Thank you.

  10. #35
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae's Avatar

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    There is a new volume in the great Oxford History of the United States coming in September finally:



    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0199735816/
    The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multivolume history of the American nation. In the newest volume in the series, The Republic for Which It Stands, acclaimed historian Richard White offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America.

    At the end of the Civil War the leaders and citizens of the victorious North envisioned the country's future as a free-labor republic, with a homogenous citizenry, both black and white. The South and West were to be reconstructed in the image of the North. Thirty years later Americans occupied an unimagined world. The unity that the Civil War supposedly secured had proved ephemeral. The country was larger, richer, and more extensive, but also more diverse. Life spans were shorter, and physical well-being had diminished, due to disease and hazardous working conditions. Independent producers had become wage earners. The country was Catholic and Jewish as well as Protestant, and increasingly urban and industrial. The "dangerous" classes of the very rich and poor expanded, and deep differences-ethnic, racial, religious, economic, and political-divided society. The corruption that gave the Gilded Age its name was pervasive.

    These challenges also brought vigorous efforts to secure economic, moral, and cultural reforms. Real change-technological, cultural, and political-proliferated from below more than emerging from political leadership. Americans, mining their own traditions and borrowing ideas, produced creative possibilities for overcoming the crises that threatened their country.

    In a work as dramatic and colorful as the era it covers, White narrates the conflicts and paradoxes of these decades of disorienting change and mounting unrest, out of which emerged a modern nation whose characteristics resonate with the present day.
    This is volume seven of twelve, and I have all the previous ones, with the last being released all the way back in 2009. Now only three volumes remain: 1, 2, and 8 (I'm really really hoping for those first two to come sooner rather than later).

  11. #36
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    Amazon now has the Look Inside feature and the book is getting rave reviews:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/01...der_0199735816

  12. #37
    Citizen of Gilead RC65 is just really nice RC65 is just really nice RC65 is just really nice RC65 is just really nice

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    I always have one non-fiction book going alongside whatever fiction book I'm reading. The non-fiction book tends to get less reading time, so I probably finish three fiction books to every non-fiction book.

  13. #38
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    https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily...oric-monuments
    Earlier this month, “Greater Gotham,” the long-anticipated second volume of Mike Wallace’s history of New York City, was published. The first volume, which Wallace co-wrote with Edward Burrows, won the Pulitzer Prize for History, in 1999. It has not gone unnoted that babies born in the city the year it appeared are now old enough to fret over whom to vote for in next month’s mayoral and City Council races. In New York, a city where history accrues at the velocity of a blizzard, cloaking the contours of what we consider familiar in the world, a century can seemingly fit into two decades. The new volume, like the city it chronicles, sprawls to epic dimensions. Though it covers just twenty-one years, from 1898 to 1919—the first volume covered the preceding three centuries—it runs to nearly twelve hundred pages, describing the lives of business titans, idealistic reformers, brilliant artists, crooked pols, honest pols, and pols who may have been both, depending on the hour of the day, alongside those of regiments of engineers, architects, philanthropists, developers, educators, laborers, immigrants, clergy, gangsters, writers, publishers, and radicals, all bound by the common adhesive of ambition. We are living in a city bequeathed to us by those distant actors, and it is impossible to comb through that volume without noting the selectivity with which we decide what to remember about the past.

    It is an interesting moment to consider the history of New York and, by extension, a great deal of American history. A week after the publication of “Greater Gotham,” the Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments and Markers, which Bill de Blasio created in the wake of the Charlottesville crisis, held its first meeting. The eighteen-member commission, which includes artists, architects, historians, an anthropologist, and Harry Belafonte, was charged with the unenviable task of reviewing the city’s constellation of memorials for contemporary appropriateness. In the immediate wake of Charlottesville, there was a perception that the committee would lead to the public toppling of problematic tributes, akin to the way that New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu dispatched four Confederate monuments this past summer. Mayor De Blasio later stated that the committee’s function would be decidedly less cinematic; after ninety days, it would simply issue guidelines for how to handle monuments deemed “inconsistent with the values of New York City.” Depending on how one defines that term, this might include the statue of Christopher Columbus, at Columbus Circle, the monument to the physician J. Marion Sims, at Fifth Avenue and 103rd Street, or the marker for Philippe Pétain, the French First World War hero who became a Nazi collaborator, on lower Broadway. One need not wade through all twenty-four chapters of “Greater Gotham” to recognize the moral labyrinth entailed in a phrase like “the values of New York City.”

    Two days before the commission met, the city held its annual Columbus Day Parade. Melissa Mark-Viverito, the Council Speaker, is one of a growing number of voices demanding that the statue of Columbus be removed from Columbus Circle, given that his exploration prefaced the colonization of the Western Hemisphere and the eventual genocidal devastation of indigenous communities in the Caribbean. It is increasingly common in some quarters to hear the holiday referred to as “Indigenous People’s Day.” De Blasio demurred when asked about the future of Columbus Circle, but did state that he is a proud Italian-American.

    On the morning of the commission’s first meeting, City Council members Brad Lander and Laurie Cumbo, along with the Democratic Majority Leader, Jimmy Van Bramer, sent a letter to the commission pointing out that even if the city chooses to remove markers that, in their term, “glamorize racism,” it would only amount to half the task. The other half would be to create new monuments to events in history that have gone unheralded, such as the Brownsville, Brooklyn, site of the first Planned Parenthood clinic, which Margaret Sanger opened in 1916, and the route, down Fifth Avenue, of the N.A.A.C.P.’s silent march of some ten thousand African-Americans, in 1917, to protest lynching. The Draft Riots of 1863 shook the city, and highlighted to Abraham Lincoln the depths of Northern resentment of his prosecution of the Civil War, but there is no marker to commemorate the more than a hundred New Yorkers who were killed during the upheaval. The issue, the Council members argued, is not just what we edit out but what we put in its place.

    Charlottesville, certainly from the vantage point of City Hall, makes history look like a straightforward proposition. The bands of white men who gathered in defense of the monument to Robert E. Lee, like the men who erected it, nearly a century ago, were not arguing about the past but presenting a specific claim to the present—and, thereby, their preferred version of the future. When Donald Trump blustered about the activists who were intent on removing the Lee statue eventually going after Jefferson and Washington, too, he was, as is typical of him, eliding a great deal of nuance. Jefferson, the genius architect of American liberty, enslaved his own children, along with six hundred other people. Washington liberated the colonies from the grip of the British Empire and had the foresight to issue a farewell address that warned against the very polarities that now define American society. But, as Erica Armstrong Dunbar notes in her recent book, “Never Caught,” Washington also spent years attempting to track down Ona Judge, an African-American fugitive from his Virginia plantation. The distinction, however, is that Jefferson and Washington’s defenders largely praise them despite their racial hypocrisies. The monument to Lee was erected precisely because of his actions to prolong and preserve those hypocrisies. J. Marion Sims, the pioneering gynecologist who perfected a treatment for fistulas by operating on enslaved women who could not consent, is memorialized on the grounds of the South Carolina State House, across the plaza from where, until two years ago, the Confederate battle flag flew. It is not ironic that he is also memorialized just outside Central Park, in New York City. The lines of morality do not necessarily parallel the lines of geography.

    The week after the Charlottesville riot, Sims’s statue was splashed with red paint and the word “RACIST” was written across its back. But there is another consideration, mostly left out the conversation about monuments to the redacted past, that, in removing those tributes, we are performing our own historical redaction. Future generations might be spared the insult of knowing that medical experimentation on enslaved women is not so grievous an offense as to preclude the person who performed it being honored with a public memorial. But they would also be spared the important knowledge that earlier generations once thought this way, and history—in essence, a chronicle of evolution—would be diminished, again. The wisest path is to leave the controversial monuments where they stand, while appending additional markers—a reflection of contemporary values—stating that, in a dimmer moment in our understanding, we erected tributes to causes and to citizens that were deeply compromised. Then follow those actions with the creation of tributes that reflect our contemporary understanding of the world and humanity. Mike Wallace points out in the final chapter of “Greater Gotham” that what is remarkable about New York City’s history is not the fault lines and divisions but the fact that the fractiousness was not more severe. In the early years of the past century, as Europe set itself on a path to tribalist warfare, New York was inventing itself as an amalgam of global identities. This is an ongoing task. We can repurpose those tributes as markers of our past ignorance and the long route we travelled to emerge from it.
    http://www.npr.org/2017/10/04/553975...great-big-city
    Like Russia, New York City inspires big, doorstop-size books, epitomized by the six-volume Iconography of Manhattan Island by I.N. Phelps Stokes (published between 1915 and 1928, weighing in at 35 pounds). The picture swims into clearer focus when we realize that Gotham, the brand-name-style moniker employed by Mike Wallace for Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919, his follow-up to the Pulitzer winning Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898 (written with Edwin G. Burrows), is in English folklore a town — originally "Goat Town" — where all the inhabitants pretend to be insane. So, madness, at great length.

    Wallace's fabulous new work of encyclopedic nonfiction gives readers delightful glimpses of madness, feigned or otherwise, along with other kaleidoscopic aspects of turn-of-the-last-century New York. The over-6-pound, 1,196-page telling is especially rich because of the author's "determination to include all the historical actors that had been left out of earlier studies ... and a conviction that a synthesis of perspectives — economic, cultural, political and social — makes for a compelling narrative." Dead white men are here, indeed, but they don't dominate.

    Dip your bucket anywhere and you will find something engaging. Every reader will have their favorite passages. Mine ran the gamut, each one making me want to go find a friend and share. Workers on the IRT subway line unearth mastodon bones at Dyckman Street. Meanwhile, horses drop 60,000 gallons of urine and 2.5 million pounds of manure on the cobblestones every day. And something called "The Monkey House Scandal" casts grand opera icon Enrico Caruso as "a vile seducer of womanhood," accused of pinching a woman's behind in the Central Park Zoo.

    The two-decades-plus span of Greater Gotham kicks off on New Year's Eve 1897, when citizens paraded by the thousand, field guns boomed, rockets soared, and a brass band throbbed, all to mark the incorporation of Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, Manhattan and Staten Island into Greater New York City, proud to declare itself second in size only to London. The score of years to come would bring great tycoons, ingrate robber barons, and the Great War. In between, New Yorkers were summoned out of the gas-lit Gilded Age and into the bright electric light of an exuberant 20th century.

    The "sky boom" in Wallace's phrase, began in earnest with the Flatiron Building, whose "sexy cachet" derived from the wind that whipped around its 23rd Street base, lifting the hems of passing women. Ezra Pound wrote that skyscraper windows at night display "squares after squares of flame, set and cut into the aether. Here is our poetry, for we have pulled down the stars to our will."

    Times Square exploded during this era: Oscar Hammerstein opened a roof garden on Broadway "replete with real trees, and real swans a-swimming on a 40-foot lake." Showbiz men fashioned vaudeville houses, legitimate theaters, nickelodeons, photography parlors, music publishing firms, amusement parks and motion picture houses. Predatory gigolos, nicknamed "tango pirates" appeared at tea dances. "Pluggers" picked up sheet music in the morning, then spent the afternoon "performing the pieces, or cajoling others into doing so."

    In 1904 Charlotte Perkins Gilman defined a feminist as a woman who vaulted from the pedestal with "chains off, crown off, halo off." Margaret Sanger invented the term "birth control." Greater Gotham recounts many other players in a detailed account of a hugely important time of change for female Americans; such a thoroughgoing discussion of gender is unusual in a mainstream work of history. Wallace even places the zaftig, sexually charged chanteuse Sophie Tucker "at the vortex of a cultural whirlwind," which was enough to make me clap my hands.

    Greater Gotham offers a wealth of such experiences. It is this combination of the scholarly and the pop that makes it such a compelling read. The average reader will find herself eager to pick up the book — and not just for bicep curls.

  14. #39
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae has a brilliant future mae's Avatar

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    The first volume is a tremendous book, highly recommended. Here's a great interview with Mike Wallace:

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/how-new-yo...e-modern-city/

  15. #40
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    And another one here: https://charlierose.com/videos/31077

    A third volume will take it up to 1945.

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