+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: The Shining on stage

  1. #1
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default The Shining opera

    http://www.twincities.com/entertainm...ll-be-an-opera
    An oft-adapted horror classic is getting another life: as an opera.

    Minnesota Opera has obtained the rights to Stephen King's "The Shining" and commissioned composer Paul Moravec and librettist Mark Campbell to write it.

    The opera, which will be directed by Eric Simonson (who directed "Wuthering Heights" and "The Grapes of Wrath" for Minnesota Opera), will premiere in May 2016 at the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts in St. Paul. The basis of both a Stanley Kubrick film, which King didn't like, and a TV miniseries, which King himself wrote, "The Shining" features the Torrance family -- alcoholic father Jack, meek mom Wendy and their telepathic son, Danny -- trapped in a deserted hotel that has a mysterious connection to the underworld. In a news release, Moravec says of the King novel: "It features the classic elements of operatic conflict, notably the power of love in the face of extraordinary evil and destructive forces. It's a joy to imagine the musical form of this timeless contest."

    "The Shining," the title of which refers to Danny's telepathic powers, is part of the opera's New Works Initiative, a seven-year program to develop new operas and to develop new places to present opera.

    Launched in 2008, the New Works Initiative brought international acclaim to Minnesota Opera for "Silent Night," which won the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for music. Other New Works productions include last season's adaptation of the Tony-winning "Doubt" and the coming adaptation of "The Manchurian Candidate," the Richard Condon political thriller about an assassination plot. Like "The Shining," "Doubt" and "The Manchurian Candidate" also have been adapted into popular films.

    "Doctor Sleep," King's sequel to "The Shining," which follows middle-aged Danny Torrance into another battle of good against evil, will be released Sept. 24.

    For more information on Minnesota Opera's "The Shining," go to mnop.co/the-shining.


    http://www.mnopera.org/season/2015-2016/the-shining/

    Minnesota Opera announces its commission of The Shining, a new opera by composer Paul Moravec and librettist Mark Campbell, based on the 1977 best-selling novel by Stephen King. Minnesota Opera will give The Shining its world premiere in May 2016 at Ordway in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

    The Shining is the iconic supernatural horror novel that helped establish Stephen King as the genre’s definitive voice. In the story, Jack Torrance moves his wife Wendy and son Danny to the remote Overlook Hotel in Colorado, where he has been hired as winter caretaker. The family endeavors to remain together in spite of their growing isolation from the world, the hotel’s paranormal activity and Jack’s abusive nature, alcoholism and growing madness.

    “It is tremendously exciting to have received Stephen King’s permission to adapt The Shining into an opera,” said Artistic Director Dale Johnson. “Opera has the unique ability to amplify a story’s emotions, and by putting one of the most powerfully imagined stories of our time into the hands of Paul Moravec and Mark Campbell, I have no doubt The Shining will be an intensely thrilling horror opera.”

    Paul Moravec, a prolific composer whose music has been described as “highly engrossing” and “remarkably accessible,” considers The Shining a perfect fit for the art form. “King’s novel is naturally operatic: it sings,” said Moravec. “It features the classic elements of operatic conflict, notably the power of love in the face of extraordinary evil and destructive forces. It’s a joy to imagine the musical form of this timeless contest, along with the story’s evocation of terror and the supernatural.”

    A film based on King’s novel, directed by Stanley Kubrick, was released in 1980, and in 1997, Mr. King adapted his book into a television mini-series. Minnesota Opera’s commission is the work’s first adaptation for the stage. Doctor Sleep, a sequel to The Shining that follows the middle-aged Danny Torrance into another epic battle of good against evil, will be released on September 24, 2013.

    “I really look forward to working with Paul to help make King’s original story sing,” said Mark Campbell, the librettist for Minnesota Opera’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Silent Night and the upcoming world premiere of The Manchurian Candidate (both with composer Kevin Puts). “I’m thrilled to once again be working with everyone from Minnesota Opera and the New Works Initiative, director Eric Simonson and maestro Michael Christie.”

    The commission of The Shining launches the second generation of Minnesota Opera’s New Works Initiative. A pioneering movement in new opera when it was launched in 2008, the Initiative was designed to invigorate the operatic art form with an infusion of contemporary works and formalized Minnesota Opera’s commitment to artistic growth, leadership and innovation. Its first iteration – a seven-season commitment to producing premieres and revivals of new works – funded the commissions of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize-winning Silent Night (Kevin Puts and Mark Campbell), last season’s Doubt by Douglas J. Cuomo and librettist John Patrick Shanley and the upcoming political thriller, The Manchurian Candidate (also by Puts and Campbell), which will have its premiere in March 2015.

    Now in the penultimate year of that first phase, Minnesota Opera reveals the future of the New Works Initiative. This next iteration is being conceived as a 10-year program that will not only encompass major commissions like The Shining for its mainstage season at the Ordway, but endeavors to further invigorate the art form and expand its audience by creating new works conceived for non-traditional opera venues. To that end, a hallmark of this new program will be the creation of local and national partnerships to develop new ways of creating, workshopping and presenting opera. Programmatic plans will be released seasonally.

  2. #2
    Don't. Get. Married. Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon has a reputation beyond repute Shannon's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    7,664
    My Mood
    Twisted
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    Interesting. I'd see it.

  3. #3
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default The Shining on stage

    http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/20...-shining/?_r=0
    If you’ve always wanted to unleash your inner Jack Nicholson, and will be in Nebraska this winter, then here’s an opportunity. The Benson Theater, an enterprising Omaha company, is hoping to raise the money to buy and renovate a 1923 theater to call home, and among its fund-raising projects is a new theatrical version of “The Shining,” Stephen King’s tale of a substance-abusing and increasingly crazed hotel overseer stuck with his family at a resort during the snowy off-season – the role Mr. Nicholson played to magnificently creepy excess in the 1980 Stanley Kubrick film. The company is holding auditions this week.

    Though Mr. King is known to have disliked the Kubrick film, he gave the Benson company permission to create its stage version. The script was written by Jason Levering and Aaron Sailors. Both writers live in Omaha; Mr. Levering is a founder of the Omaha Film Festival and is on the Benson company board. The play is scheduled for two performances, on March 21 and 22.

    It joins a slowly growing list of stage versions of Mr. King’s horror stories. A musical version of “Carrie,” though a flop on Broadway, has developed a cult following over the years, and had a revival in New York in 2012. Mr. King’s 1987 novel “Misery” has been adapted into two theatrical versions, in addition to the 1990 film with Kathy Bates. He also collaborated with John Mellencamp on a musical staging of “Ghost Brothers of Darkland County” in 2012, and this past fall, the San Francisco Opera presented Tobias Picker’s operatic version of “Dolores Claiborne.
    http://www.playbill.com/news/article...-Acts-in-Omaha
    The Benson Theatre in Omaha will present the world premiere of Stephen King's The Shining, staged as a play in five acts, in March. The production acts as a fundraiser for the Benson Theatre Project.

    The Shining, Benson Theatre's first major production, will be directed by Jason Levering from a script — approved by King — that was written by Levering and Aaron Sailors.

    Advising the production are Tom Elkins, director of the film "The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia," and Kevin Lawler, producing artistic director of the Great Plains Theatre Conference and co-founder of the Blue Barn Theatre.

    According to the play's official Facebook page, "'The Shining' was first released in 1977. It was Stephen King's third novel and his first hardcover bestseller, and it was the book that cemented King as one of the leading authors in the horror industry. Mr. King originally conceived 'The Shining' as a play – a tragedy in five acts – but it instead evolved into a novel with five parts. The story follows the gradual dismantling and eventual fall of the Torrance family at the hands of a sinister supernatural force, and it is rife with the intense drama and startling violence often found in Greek tragedies."

    Tommy Wilson, Charlie Wagner and the team at JSAV will provide lighting, and Kit Gough will design the set.

    The company's goal is to "acquire and restore the historic Benson Theatre at 6054 Maple Street in Omaha to serve as a shared community space for business education and artistic performance."

    Auditions for The Shining are being held Jan. 9 and Jan. 11.

    For more information, visit the production's Facebook page or BensonTheatre.org.

  4. #4
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    http://www.twincities.com/entertainm...-stephen-kings
    If you were among the many who experienced the imaginative, semi-animated production of "The Magic Flute" that Minnesota Opera presented last year, you set a record for the most popular production in the company's 50-plus-year history. If you weren't, you have another chance.

    The Minnesota Opera is bringing that production back as part of its 2015-16 season. It's also reviving its 2008 staging of Antonin Dvorak's "Rusalka" and is presenting Giacomo Puccini's very popular "Tosca" for the first time since 2006. Lest you think it a "greatest hits" season, know that it opens with a relatively rarely staged comedy by Richard Strauss and concludes with the world premiere of Paul Moravec's operatic adaptation of Stephen King's novel, "The Shining."

    Yes, Minnesota Opera does the classics well, but some of its finest productions have come when it's premiered new operas like Ricky Ian Gordon's "The Grapes of Wrath," Kevin Puts' Pulitzer-winning "Silent Night" or Douglas Cuomo's "Doubt." Another Pulitzer winner, Paul Moravec, is adapting Stephen King's novel about a family at a haunted hotel and is reportedly hewing far closer to King's book than Stanley Kubrick's film. Baritone Brian Mulligan showed during 2013's excellent "Hamlet" that he does well with characters driven mad by ghosts, so he should make for a very interesting Jack Torrance alongside Kaduce's Wendy. It runs May 7-15, 2016.

    All performances take place at the Ordway Music Theater. Season subscriptions ranging from $815 to $110 and three-opera packages starting at $75 are currently available at mnopera.org, and will be available at 612-333-6669 on Monday Tickets to individual productions go on sale in July.

  5. #5
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    http://www.startribune.com/spooky-mu...era/353074221/
    It's a safe bet that nothing resembling the line, "Did you remember the parking brake?" has ever before been written for an opera. But there's a lot of new ground being broken with Minnesota Opera's new commission of "The Shining," arguably Stephen King's best-known horror novel and also immortalized on film. With music and libretto by two Pulitzer winners (Paul Moravec and Mark Campbell, respectively), the commission, premiering next May, promises to be a noteworthy addition to the opera's new-works initiative, which has previously brought musical adaptations of modern classics including "Doubt" and "The Manchurian Candidate" to the stage.

    Opera supporters in the audience included Margaret Wurtele, John and Ruth Huss, Sara and Jack Donaldson, William White and Gus Blanchard.

    Both composer Moravec and librettist Campbell were present at a private workshop of the opera's First Act Friday night, held at the company's rehearsal space in the Warehouse District of downtown Minneapolis. Moravec seemed to like what he heard, smiling as he tapped a foot to one of the cinematically grand orchestral interludes used to convey the passage of time.

    "Opera is about three things -- love, death and power," Moravec said. "This story was practically an opera already." He likened the story to the biblical tale of Abraham and Isaac: "He's getting instructions from a higher power to both protect his son and to kill him. It's unresolvable."

    He said that, with the aid of multimedia effects, "psychological unease" will build, creating "moments of genuine shock."

    The opera follows King's book, not Stanley Kubrick's film, which King famously dislikes. Moravec summed up key differences as "Wendy is smart, Hallorann the cook is a hero, and Jack isn't crazy from the beginning."

  6. #6
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    https://www.minnpost.com/artscape/20...un-being-scary
    Mark Campbell may be America’s busiest, most in-demand librettist. For the Minnesota Opera alone, he has written the words for five operas, all of which had (or will have) their world premieres here.

    First was “Silent Night,” which won composer Kevin Puts the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for music. Then last year’s “Manchurian Candidate,” also with Puts. And “Memory Boy” with Reinaldo Moya, seen at the Lab Theater in February, written for the opera’s youth training program. And next year’s “Dinner at Eight,” with Pulitzer and Grammy winner William Bolcom.

    And this year’s “The Shining” with Pulitzer winner Paul Moravec, based on the mega-bestselling horror novel by Stephen King (and definitely not the movie by Stanley Kubrick, which King famously dislikes). It opens Thursday and is already sold out, except for a few remaining standing-room tickets.

    “It’s more than I’ve written for any other company,” Campbell said, “and I’m pretty sure it’s more than any librettist has written for any single company in this country’s history.”

    What has made Campbell the Minnesota Opera’s go-to librettist? We asked artistic director Dale Johnson. “The telling of the story is the most important thing,” he said Monday by phone. “The story is the foundation for the composer. When we were doing ‘Silent Night,’ I looked at a lot of different librettists. Mark understood pace, and he understood what I would call terseness. He knows not to write too much, to allow the composer’s voice to come through.

    “I think a lot of American opera is too talky. I found Mark’s work so efficient, yet somehow so beautifully written. He understood the arc of the drama really, really well. So I put him and Kevin Puts and [director] Eric Simonson together and it worked out to be great. When you have a good one, you keep him.”

    Another new opera with Campbell is in the planning stages, but Johnson isn’t ready to reveal details other than “it will be a family-oriented piece. Not a kids’ show, but a real family show.”

    Minnesota Opera isn’t Campbell’s sole employer. To date, he’s written librettos for 15 operas, including three more opening next year, among them “The (R)evolution of Stephen Jobs,” with Mason Bates, for the Santa Fe Opera and “Elizabeth Cree,” with Puts, for Opera Philadelphia. Four more are in the pipeline. Campbell is a man who has found his calling.

    We spoke with him last year, before “The Manchurian Candidate,” and met with him again in late March at the Minnesota Opera Center.

    On how “The Shining” became an opera:

    Mark Campbell: It all started with Eric Simonson and Dale Johnson. They wanted to do a horror opera, something scary. Stephen King, of course, was the first author who came to mind, and then Eric suggested “The Shining.”

    Dale had heard Paul’s music and liked it a great deal, and Paul said yes, he’d love to do it. Then they asked me if I’d write the libretto.

    I’m a fan of the movie, but the movie is not operatic at all. There’s no journey of any character. So I went back and read the novel and thought, “This is a very exciting idea for an opera.” I didn’t really know if I could do it, but I said yes because I wanted to work with Paul.

    On acquiring the rights from Stephen King:

    It took a long time. I think I was first approached about [this project] in 2012. Stephen King is wonderful – he’s very progressive, and he’s really a cool guy. But there is this world he needs to have around him to protect him, and to get through that is pretty difficult. Paul had hired a lawyer from California to work on it, and we had lawyers from Minnesota Opera working on it, and we couldn’t get through.

    And then Paul remembered that his next-door neighbor and friend is a guy named Peter Straub, who is also a horror writer. And Stephen King and Peter Straub have worked together. So Paul either emailed him or knocked on his door and said, “I promise not to embarrass you, but can I email Stephen King directly? Because we’re just not getting through his lawyers.” Paul emailed Stephen King and got a response within 20 minutes. In it, King said, “I don’t know what the hold-up is. I’d love for this to happen.”

    On getting King’s approval for the libretto:

    When I finished the libretto, it went first to Eric and Paul. They had a little bit of input. I included that, and then I did a chicken thing – I sent it off [to King] on the day before Thanksgiving. I’m thinking, “He can’t be mean to me on Thanksgiving!”

    I was heading off to a dinner and checked my email before I went, and there was an email from the lawyer who handled the whole thing – basically, “Congratulations. Stephen King has approved the libretto. Go forward.”

    He approved the libretto in less than 24 hours. That was one of the great reliefs of my life. If he’d come back with changes, it might have gone on for a couple of years. But I was true to the heart of his novel.

    On turning King’s novel into a libretto:

    Everybody knows the story of “The Shining.” One of my issues early on was how do I remove everyone’s version of “The Shining”? Because they’ve all seen the movie. How do I get that out of their heads? So many people joked with me about how we were going to set “Heeeeere’s Johnny!” But we didn’t have to, because it’s not in the book.

    Pacing, suspense and tension are important in this opera. We can’t let up. It has to be relentless. But relentlessly exciting, too. I’ve seen operas that are just simply relentless, and I stop listening because I feel like I’m being yelled at. I hope we have created a story where we really care about [characters] Wendy and Danny and Jack and Halloran. I planted lots of very sympathetic moments early on. …

    There were so many big decisions in writing this, but whenever you look at suspense, you start with [Alfred] Hitchcock. He was one of my favorite writers. Everything you ever need to know about playwriting is in Hitchcock. One thing he does that’s so amazing is he just … withholds. He gives you just enough information to remain interested, and not confused, and uneasy. And then he gives you a little bit more.

    The entire Act One of “The Shining” is giving enough information so there will be a payoff, but also holding back. … You give the audience this much, and then you give them this much, and then you knock them flat, and that’s what I hope our Act Two does.

    King’s novel is around 600 pages long and roughly 200,000 words. Campbell’s libretto comes in under 10,000 words. On how he made “The Shining” so much shorter:

    The novel takes place over four or five months. I’ve put it into a month and a half. … Time is stretched out in the novel. [In the opera] it has to happen quicker. But I did need to show time passing.

    I emailed Paul and said, “I think I’m going to have four musical interludes in this opera. They’re to show time passing. There will be things going on, but no language.” Paul was, like, “Great!” Composers love interludes. A lot of good operas have them. One thing interludes do very well is serve as palate cleansers. Like, “We’ve been hearing a lot of words. Now let’s just hear some music and watch things.” …

    Simple and clear are the hardest things to achieve. At the very basic nature of a good libretto is simplification so that the music can be big and expand. If the libretto is complicated, if it uses a lot of words and it shows off, if the writer is trying to show off, the libretto and the music both fight. So I have to get out of the way. …

    You don’t want your libretto to be dull. You do want to use some good, nice juicy words, but at the same time, I believe that the poetry is in the music and not necessarily in the words. There is a limited amount of poetry that can be put into a libretto. …

    It should be simple, and it should be as natural as possible in this extremely unnatural art form called opera.

    “The Shining” is Campbell’s first horror opera. Was it fun to write?

    Terrific fun. Are you kidding me? I loved it.

    ***

    “The Shining,” with music by Paul Moravec and libretto by Mark Campbell, opens Thursday, May 7, at the Ordway Music Theater in St. Paul. A few standing-room tickets remain ($28); call 612-333-6669. Ends Sunday, May 15.

  7. #7
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    http://www.playbill.com/article/list...ra-the-shining
    In May this year, the Minnesota Opera concluded its 2015-16 season with the world premiere of The Shining, a new opera by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Paul Moravec and librettist Mark Campbell. The show, which garnered positive reviews from critics, was an authorized adaptation of Stephen King's 1977 best-selling novel about a family haunted by paranormal activity in a remote hotel. The novel was also adapted as a popular film starring Jack Nicholson.

    The Shining debuted at Music Theater at the Ordway in St. Paul, MN, May 7 and ran through May 15. The complete opera, as well as a scene-by-scene guide, is now available to listen to via Classical MPR until November 30 only. It runs for one hour and 51 minutes.

    The Shining, according to earlier press notes, is “a gripping thriller about the struggles of Jack Torrance, his wife Wendy and their son Danny, to survive the isolation of the Overlook Hotel in Colorado where Jack has been engaged as winter caretaker. The family endeavors to remain together in spite of their growing isolation from the world, the hotel’s paranormal activity and Jack’s abusive nature, alcoholism and growing madness.”

    The cast included Brian Mulligan as Jack Torrance, Kelly Kaduce as Wendy Torrance, Alejandro Vega as Danny Torrance, Arthur Woodley as Dick Hallorann, Mark Walters as Mark Torrance, Alex Ritchie as Horace Derwent, John Robert Lindsey as Lloyd the Bartender, David Walton as Delbert Grady, Robb Asklof as Stuart Ullman, Rick Penning as Bill Watson, Shannon Prickett as Mrs. Massey, and Jeni Houser as Mrs. Grady.

    Rounding out the cast were Cassie Klinga, Zoey Paulson, Joel Mathias, Alegandro Magallón, Benjamin Sieverding, Ben Crickenberger, Ben Johnson, and Lu Zang.

    The creative team also included Michael Christie (conductor), Eric Simonson (stage director), Heidi Spesard-Noble (choreographer), Erhard Rom (scenery and properties design), 59 Productions (animation and projection design), Kärin Kopischke (costume design), Robert Wierzel (lighting design), C. Andrew Mayer (sound design), and David Zimmerman (wig and makeup design).
    http://www.classicalmpr.org/story/20...a-opera-listen
    This past May, the Minnesota Opera presented the world premiere of The Shining. The opera was an immediate sensation, selling out completely and earning critical raves. In cooperation with the Minnesota Opera, Classical Minnesota Public Radio is now pleased to present the complete streaming audio of The Shining, as performed live during that premiere run. This exclusive listening opportunity will be available for a limited time only: through Nov. 30.

    The opera, composed by Paul Moravec with libretto by Mark Campbell, is an authorized adaptation of Stephen King's classic 1977 novel about a family haunted by ghosts at a remote mountain hotel. Many are familiar with the story through Stanley Kubrick's 1980 movie, but King was displeased with some significant changes Kubrick made to the novel's story and tone; the opera hews much more closely to King's original vision.

    To guide your listening, below is a scene-by-scene guide to the complete opera. (The scene titles and summaries are my own.) Credits for the production appear at the end of this post; this recording is an edited composite of multiple performances.

    Now, settle in to enjoy The Shining...and don't forget to leave a light on.

  8. #8
    Servant of Gan DoctorZaius is a name known to all DoctorZaius is a name known to all DoctorZaius is a name known to all DoctorZaius is a name known to all DoctorZaius is a name known to all DoctorZaius is a name known to all

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,935
    My Mood
    Cheerful
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    I had no idea how serious a production this was. Judging by the pictures, they spared little expense in the production. I hope someone decides to travel with in the future. Bring it to Boston baby!
    WANTED:
    Drawing of the Three #255
    Gunslinger #255
    Charlie the Choo Choo - #255

  9. #9
    Demon of the Prim skyofcrack is a jewel in the rough skyofcrack is a jewel in the rough skyofcrack is a jewel in the rough skyofcrack is a jewel in the rough skyofcrack's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,094
    My Mood
    Tired
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    Jack: I'm gonna bash your fucking brains in
    I'm gonna bash your fucking brains in
    Dead girls chorus: Redrum, Redrum
    Jack: I'm gonna bash your fucking brains in
    I'm gonna bash your fucking brains in

  10. #10
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    I have to say, I like the music a lot.

  11. #11
    Oz the Gweat and Tewwible mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae has a reputation beyond repute mae's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    25,651
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default

    http://deadline.com/2017/07/stephen-...ay-1202133074/
    King’s seminal horror tale The Shining is in the early stages of being mounted for the stage as a play by Simon Stephens, the Tony-winning playwright of The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night Time, and Ivo Van Hove, the Tony-winning director of A View From The Bridge. It gives the chance for a reconsideration of the indelible stamp Stanley Kubrick put on the novel with a movie King didn’t love despite the unforgettable visual images. The film changed King’s narrative thrust — which he wrote as a man’s descent into madness from the vantage point of wife and child — to a full focus on Jack Nicholson’s blocked novelist Jack Torrance. King told Deadline last year that he likened the result to “a big, beautiful Cadillac with no engine inside it.” King’s main problem: “The character of Jack Torrance has no arc in that movie. Absolutely no arc at all. When we first see Jack Nicholson, he’s in the office of Mr. Ullman, the manager of the hotel, and you know, then, he’s crazy as a shit house rat. All he does is get crazier. In the book, he’s a guy who’s struggling with his sanity and finally loses it. To me, that’s a tragedy. In the movie, there’s no tragedy because there’s no real change.” King has hit on Broadway with Misery, and missed with Carrie. There is separately a take on The Green Mile being done for the Japan stage.

  12. #12
    Big Coffin Hunter herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest has much to be proud of herbertwest's Avatar

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Paris, France
    Posts
    9,831
    Country
    Country Flag
    Gender
    Gender

    Default The Shining opera, in May in Colorado

    Anyone living in Colorado? The "Shining" opera will be performed in May in Denver

    > More details at the Opera Colorado website : https://www.operacolorado.org/event/...s-the-shining/

    ------------------------------------------------
    CLUB STEPHEN KING (french website about STEPHEN KING, since 1992) : on : Facebook | Twitter
    ------------------------------------------------

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts