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  1. #26
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    I wrote an essay about the various versions of Carrie for FEARNet: 'Carrie' On

  2. #27
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    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/rev...-review-296385
    Venue
    Lucille Lortel Theatre, New York (runs through April 22)

    Cast
    Marin Mazzie, Molly Ranson, Christy Altomare, Carmen Cusack, Jeanna de Waal, Derek Klena

    Director
    Stafford Arima

    The original creative team behind the commercially disastrous 1988 Broadway musical adaptation of Stephen King's horror novel make a valiant attempt to wash the blood off their much-maligned baby.

    NEW YORK – The 1988 production of Carrie, the musical based on Stephen King’s novel about a high school misfit with telekinetic powers, was a critical and commercial bloodbath that became the benchmark for spectacular Broadway failure. While it ran for 16 previews and just five post-opening performances, it became something of an urban legend. If every theater insider who claims to have seen the notorious fiasco had actually been there, the show would have run for a year or more.

    Up to now, those of us not around to view the wreckage firsthand have had to settle for poor-quality bootleg clips on YouTube. But the original creative team has reunited under new director Stafford Arima to present a stripped-down, heavily revised version Off Broadway. The makeover aims to rescue Carrie from the scrap heap of musical-theater folly, paring away the camp excess to tell an earnest story of adolescent ostracism and cruelty. But those serious intentions have yielded a muted reincarnation that’s neither fish not fowl.

    After the stinging experience of Broadway, where Carrie was directed with a mix of operatic bombast and ‘80s vulgarity by Terry Hands of the Royal Shakespeare Company, the show was pulled from circulation despite countless rights requests. Composer Michael Gore (who wrote the original songs for Fame), lyricist Dean Pitchford (the screenwriter of Footloose) and book writer Lawrence D. Cohen (who also scripted Brian De Palma’s 1976 high-school gothic screen adaptation) were coaxed by Arima to release their bloodied baby from seclusion.

    A number of songs have been jettisoned – including the legendary Act II opener, “Out for Blood,” with its chant of “Kill the pig, pig, pig,” accompanied by the alarmed oinks of unseen livestock – and new tunes added. Also gone is the slutty aerobics choreography from opening number “In,” replaced by Matt Williams’ generic Spring Awakening-influenced agita. It’s more in keeping with the theme of oppressive teen conformity, if not as entertaining. In a half-baked attempt to tap into the current conversation on bullying, token references have been imposed to contemporize the story.

    But the inescapable impression remains that Carrie was never meant to be a musical – certainly not one with this unmemorable score and literal-minded, on-the-nose lyrics. The Goth-chic black prom corsage bangles available at the merchandise stand suggest some element of subversiveness, but what’s onstage is merely innocuous. In an effort to make the show connect with awkward-age teens, it’s been watered down and robbed of all the distinctive qualities that made it “terrifyingly lyrical” onscreen (in the words of Pauline Kael) and ludicrously lurid on Broadway. It’s prime exploitation material treated as intense psychodrama.

    What made the central character compelling in King’s novel and De Palma’s film was that the other kids didn’t just hate Carrie White because she was different. They were creeped out by her. She also was an unwelcome reminder of their own insecurities. Through no fault of Molly Ranson, the performer playing the title role, Carrie here becomes just a small-town outsider with an unhip wardrobe, lousy social skills and an inner resentment that spews forth in overwrought power ballads. Her telekinesis is almost an afterthought until the prom-pocalypse, when a bucket of pig’s blood gets dumped on her head, unleashing mayhem.

    Likewise, Carrie’s mother, Margaret (Marin Mazzie), has been tamed from a hellfire-spouting, lust-tormented crazy woman to an over-protective fundamentalist who wants her daughter to remain a child, as much to soothe her own loneliness as to shield the girl from sin.

    Even while thundering through the Biblical damnation of “And Eve Was Weak” (hands down best menstruation number ever from a Broadway musical), Mazzie is directed to avoid making Margaret a monster. Instead, she’s almost harmless, lacking the danger of Piper Laurie’s magnificent nutjob in the movie. (“He took me with the smell of the roadhouse whiskey on his breath, and I liked it,” was one of her more indelible moments.) The stage Margaret does get the show’s best song, “When There’s No One,” which the gifted Mazzie mines for emotional depth. But as a dark force, feeding Carrie’s paranormal retaliation, she’s ineffectual.

    Where King’s novel framed the account of the prom-night massacre as a psychological case study, Cohen here intercuts the action with good girl Sue Snell (Christy Altomare) in a police interrogation scenario out of Law & Order. Sue is played capably by Altomare, but like the other kids in the under-populated cast, she’s a cookie-cutter teen who doesn’t make much of an impression.

    Measured against their movie counterparts these characters are pallid indeed. De Palma had mischievous fun playing with screen archetypes. Amy Irving’s Sue was the noble-souled smart girl willing to sacrifice popularity to obey her conscience; William Katt’s Tommy Ross was the sensitive jock, his sun-bleached ‘fro glowing like a halo; Nancy Allen’s Chris was the quintessential morally unencumbered mean girl, snarling “I hate Carrie White” while using her oral skills to enslave John Travolta’s snickering dope Billy Nolan to her cause. There was good reason to invest in both the tragedy and retribution of these characters. Onstage, uber-bitch Chris (Jeanna de Waal) and moronic Billy (Ben Thompson) make especially dull villains.

    Leaving aside the impossible assignment of competing with Sissy Spacek’s iconic take on the role, Ranson has affecting moments, notably with sympathetic gym teacher Ms. Gardner (Carmen Cusack) or when Carrie triumphantly silences her mother and sits down to a celebratory slice of pie.

    Working on designer David Zinn’s minimalist set, Arima occasionally makes efficient use of Kevin Adams’ atmospheric lighting, Jonathan Deans’ soundscape and Sven Ortel’s projections, particularly in the climactic prom scene. But there’s a general shortage of invention to the stagecraft that further neglects the material’s roots in horror.

    Could Carrie ever work as a serious musical? Hard to say. But the impression forms while watching it that Gore, Pitchford and Cohen would be well-advised at this point just to embrace their battered creature for the freak that she is. Should they choose to forego the interventions and instead liberate the original show for licensing, they might have a parody vehicle far more captivating to audiences than this timid resurrection.

    Venue: Lucille Lortel Theatre, New York (runs through April 22)

    Cast: Marin Mazzie, Molly Ranson, Christy Altomare, Carmen Cusack, Jeanna de Waal, Derek Klena, Ben Thompson, Wayne Alan Wilcox, Corey Boardman, Blair Goldberg, F. Michael Haynie, Andy Mientus, Elly Noble, Jen Sese

    Director: Stafford Arima

    Music: Michael Gore

    Lyrics: Dean Pitchford

    Book: Lawrence D. Cohen, based on the novel by Stephen King

    Set designer: David Zinn

    Costume designer: Emily Rebholz

    Lighting designer: Kevin Adams

    Sound designer: Jonathan Deans

    Projection designer: Sven Ortel

    Orchestrations: Doug Besterman

    Vocal design: AnnMarie Milazzo

    Music direction/arrangements: Mary-Mitchell Campbell

    Choreographer: Matt Williams

    Presented by MCC Theater, by special arrangement with the Lucille Lortel Theatre Foundation

  3. #28
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    I didn't realize De Palma directed the original Carrie--time for a rewatch!
    People are always talking about truth.Everybody knows what the truth is,like it was toilet paper or somethin...All there is is bull*...One layer of bullshit on top of another...what you do in life...pick the layer of bull* that you prefer...

  4. #29
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    http://thedailynewsonline.com/entert...871e3ce6c.html
    After what happened to Carrie White the last time she went to the prom, it's a wonder she ever returned. As for those of you in the theater seats, you may wonder why you came at all.

    The MCC Theater's re-imagined production of "Carrie" that opened Thursday at the Lucille Lortel Theatre on Christopher Street is an attempt to reclaim what must be assumed is a stirring work evidently lost in the 1988 original, one of Broadway's most notorious failures.

    The result may be better, but it's nowhere near good. Some lovely music is marred by a patronizing, out-of-touch book, an overwrought tone and characters that seem as light and insubstantial as an after-school TV special.

    How bad is it? The new version directed by Stafford Arima produced quite a few titters during a recent preview. That's not good news: It's not a comedy. While it's not clear what "Carrie" is trying to be, it's not supposed to be funny.

    Originally a novel by Stephen King about a shy teen with telekinetic powers who struggles against her overbearing mother and gets a gore-drenched prom, the story was turned into a 1976 Brian De Palma film.

    Lawrence D. Cohen, the film's screenwriter, turned it into a theater piece along with music by Michael Gore and lyrics by Dean Pitchford. What emerged was a mess not entirely their fault, but it closed after five regular performances, lost $8 million and became the most expensive flop in Broadway history at the time.

    Cohen, Gore and Pitchford deserve credit for returning to try to tease out their original intention, and in some ways the times have caught up with some of the themes in King's original novel: bullying and religious fundamentalism.

    But even with the addition of Arima and a cast led by the talented Marin Mazzie ("Next to Normal") as Carrie's mother and the up-and-coming Molly Ranson in the title role, it's a bloody mess. Not enough has been done to make it better, and it veers into camp when it really doesn't want to.

    "Something terrible's going to happen!" says one character in a typical overshare, and she's right.

    The character of Carrie might be able to move chairs on the stage by using just her mind, but actually getting the seats filled in the theater night after night might be beyond her powers.

    There's simply too much and yet not enough here. The story of Carrie White is both the story of a superhero and a nerd who becomes a princess. It's also about the push-pull of mother-daughter relationships. It's about angst and being popular and growing up. But not all of it can fit and that's why the beautifully voiced Mazzie is a one-note religious psycho who simply quotes scripture, while Ranson's transformation from dork to beauty to potential mass murderer has to be rushed.

    Some of the returning songs — "In," ''Open Your Heart" and "Unsuspecting Hearts" — are still quite nice, and some of the new ones — the pretty "You Shine," ''The World According to Chris" and "A Night We'll Never Forget" — fit in nicely.

    What doesn't fit is the attempt from a group of men on the other side of 40 to sound like teenagers. The action is updated to present day, but the dialogue and lyrics smack of "Porky's."

    "Oh, c'mon, church-girl — dance with me. I'll make you see God," the head bully teases Carrie at one point, although he looks more like he's in grad school than high school. In one song, three boys sing: "We better get laid! It's the least we deserve, after everything we've paid."

    Two secondary characters — Tommy, the cliched big-hearted star football player and secret novelist (a solid Derek Klena) and his girlfriend, the all-around Miss Perfect who tries to show compassion to Carrie (an underused Christy Altomare) — look lifted from Archie Comics. One thing that might get cut immediately: the closeted gay bully who has a fondness for his male friends.

    The adults fare no better. A meddling gym teacher played by Carmen Cusack, who along with a Will Schuester character will make you want to go home and see "Glee" instead, at one point asks the bullying girls: "Do any of you stop to think that Carrie White has feelings? Do any of you ever stop to think?" Uh, like, no.

    There are some nice touches, like the projections by Sven Ortel of candles, crosses and bright colors against David Zinn's simple set that mostly consists of a pair of gym doors. The final frenzy of Carrie's anger leaves her tormentors splattered against the back wall nicely, and the lack of an actual blood bath in favor of the digital kind is a relief.

    Maybe "Carrie" simply cannot be turned into a good musical. Please no third try: No one can bear a re-imagining of this re-imagining. Maybe we should take advice from the musical and just suck it up: "All this high-school drama, none of it means anything," one character says. "Before you know it, it'll all be over."

  5. #30
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    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...n_1338256.html
    Stafford Arima wants to make sure no one laughs at Carrie on prom night this year -- or when they do, it's with her rather that at her.

    The veteran theater director, who helmed the Off-Broadway smash "Altar Boyz" and the premiere London production of "Ragtime," might just have tackled his most ambitious project yet -- a scaled-down, re-conceived and altogether overhauled incarnation of "Carrie," the panned 1988 musical about a misfit teen who wreaks havoc on her high school class using supernatural powers after being the butt of one brutal prank too many.

    Arima's new Off-Broadway version, which opened March 1 at New York's Lucille Lortel Theatre, shifts Stephen King's 1974 classic to the post-Columbine present day, when the central themes of teen bullying, high school torment and even adolescent murder are perhaps even more timely. Though fans of King's book or the 1976 Brian DePalma film starring Sissy Spacek will be relieved to find the familiar story left virtually intact, the show's creative team (Arima, composer Michael Gore, lyricist Dean Pitchford and book writer Lawrence D. Cohen) have strived to give "Carrie" a fresh, modern shine.

    For inspiration, Arima says he thought about his own personal experiences within the gay community. "In reading King's novel for the first time, I realized that Carrie's telekinetic powers are a metaphor for being different," Arima says. "That being different could mean someone who's an ethnic minority or someone who's gay, or someone who wears glasses. We all know what it's like to be different, whether it's in high school or in life. The universality of that feeling, I think, is what has attracted people to this story in all of its various incarnations."

    Though still imperfect in its specifics, the result is a camp-free show that's nonetheless finely acted, well sung and inventively staged. Molly Ransom is particularly stirring in the title role, while Marin Mazzie ("Next to Normal") gives Carrie's renegade Christian mother Margaret a more humanized, yet still off-her-rocker, touch. A talented ensemble can't hide the fact that many of the secondary characters are disposable (perhaps rightfully so, given the show's climax). But gay fans will nonetheless appreciate the scene-stealing Corey Boardman as a possibly questioning teen with a less-than-subtle crush on Derek Klena's Tommy Ross, the button-handsome jock who eventually serves as Carrie's ill-fated prom date.

    "It's always been important to me when you create an ensemble of characters -- in this case, the students -- that we create a community," Arima notes. "There wasn't any specific intent to create a confused young man. It wasn't written this way, but we thought maybe the character of George has a crush on Tommy, and that it's something he could never say. Corey just thought that was an interesting idea."

    Of course, both cast and crew are aware that "Carrie" boasts a theatrical legacy so notorious, it inspired "Not Since Carrie," Ken Mandelbaum's 1992 book about Broadway musical failures. Scorched by critics and audiences, the original 1988 production shuttered after just five performances; however, that premature closing also sparked a rabid cult following eager to snap up the few, low-quality bootleg recordings, photos and videos of the show which exist.

    As such, this re-shaping of "Carrie" from its gothic horror origins into a more subdued, cautionary anti-bullying tale has been met with mixed reviews from theatergoers, some of whom are hoping to see the more campy elements of both the original production and the story itself emphasized. Similarly, those anticipating a fiery holocaust during show's final sequence will be surprised by its blood-free staging, which is driven mostly by trick lighting. Still, "it's touching the people who come to see it," says Christy Altomare, who plays good girl Sue. "No one wants to see anyone bullied, no one wants to see anyone mistreated. Multiple teenagers have come up to me after the show and tell me they can relate to this story." As for whether or not this version induces the laughs that the original production received, Altomare notes, "There is genuine laughter in the house, but it comes out of the situation."

    With regard to the story's innate gay appeal, Arima observes, "I've always found it interesting in the gay community that we come from an environment of being pointed out, ridiculed and laughed at, but then even within our own community we can be made fun of because we're not wearing the proper clothing or we don't have the right body type. As human beings, no matter where we come from, we can still feel like outsiders even within our own community."

    Arima also hopes his new version of "Carrie" will accurately reflect theatergoers' current tastes in both its style and execution. As such, the Off-Broadway success of "Silence! The Musical" (based on 1991's "Silence of the Lambs") means audiences just might just be more willing to embrace a musicalized horror story than they were in 1988.

    "Musicals are an interesting beast because at their core, there's something unrealistic about them," he says. "One doesn't necessarily start to sing when sitting down to dinner with your mother. But sometimes the most potent and most interesting stories are the ones that people don't expect to see in a musical format. 'Carrie' has one of those interesting narratives."

    What lies next for the show is anyone's guess, but Arima says they're thrilled at the planned run's four-week extension through April 22. "People are wanting to hear it, see it, experience it and perhaps be touched by it," Arima notes, before concluding with a metaphor that Carrie's mother herself might be proud of. "There are so many possibilities for a piece like this on any level, but whatever happens in its future is in the hands of the theater angels at this point."
    Some nice photos there.

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    http://www.vulture.com/2012/03/carri...oe-moretz.html

    We Hear the Top Candidates for the Carrie Remake Are ...

    Warm up the bucket of pig blood — we’re getting closer to finding us a Carrie! A gaggle of actresses have been reading for the lead role in Kimberly Peirce’s adaptation of Stephen King's book (which will reportedly hew closer to the source than Brian DePalma's 1976 horror classic), and now we're told the field has narrowed to two main contenders: the 15-year-old Chloë Moretz (Kick-Ass) and the 24-year-old Haley Bennett, who is starring with Ryan Gosling in Terrence Malick's next project, Lawless.
    These two sit at the top of a list of candidates that has included such young up-and-comers as Dakota Fanning (all growed up and, lately, a Volturi in Twilight), Emily Browning (Sucker Punch), Bella Heathcote (In Time), and Lily Collins (Mirror Mirror), who have all read for Peirce. We also hear that earlier this week, The Descendants' Shailene Woodley passed on an offer from MGM to take the title role.
    Meanwhile, we're also told that for the role of Carrie's unhinged fundamentalist mother, Peirce has approached Jodie Foster and is interested in Julianne Moore. It's not so strange to aim for past Oscar winners for a horror flick: After all, both Sissy Spacek and Piper Laurie (who played her mom) got nominated for the film.

    Chloe Moretz


    Haley Bennet

  7. #32
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    Child star Chloe Grace Moretz has landed the leading role in a movie remake of Stephen King’s chilling horror tale Carrie.

    The Hugo actress, 15, will portray possessed teenager Carrie White in the supernatural film, taking on the part made famous by a young Sissy Spacek in director Brian De Palma’s classic 1976 adaptation.

    Filmmaker Kim Pierce will direct the new project and Moretz is thrilled at the prospect of bringing Carrie to a new generation.

    In a Twitter.com post on Tuesday, she writes, “Never been so happy in my life! Thank you Kim Pierce and thank u MGM for the chance of a lifetime i will never forget!”

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    Not a bad choice.



    Here she is in the upcoming Tim Burton "Dark Shadows" film, which I am really looking forward to even though it's nothing like the series:


  9. #34
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    She seems too cute to be Carrie. We'll see what makeup will do.

    John

  10. #35
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    But too pretty to be Carrie and she's not old enough. I don't feel good about this remake. I wonder if Justin Bieber is gonna play Tommy Ross. I really think this remake is gonna suck, at least for a fan of King and the 1976 adaptation...but for the youngsters this is likely going to be awesome. Oh well...

  11. #36
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    Well, if Justin was in the remake it should bring some more visibility to this project... but.. no thanks.
    ------------------------------------------------
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    Yeah, well, it does seem like a movie targeted at teens. But on the other hand it may rock (but likely not).

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhanic View Post
    She seems too cute to be Carrie. We'll see what makeup will do.

    John
    In the words of Mel Gibson, "they'll have to ugly her up some."
    People are always talking about truth.Everybody knows what the truth is,like it was toilet paper or somethin...All there is is bull*...One layer of bullshit on top of another...what you do in life...pick the layer of bull* that you prefer...

  14. #39
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    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/10/th...of-carrie.html
    After achieving notoriety as a nightmarishly campy, $8 million flop on Broadway in 1988, the musical “Carrie” rose from the ashes as a fervently earnest, $1.5 million revival Off Broadway this winter, and ran for 80 performances, or about four times as many as the original production had. But the second coming it wasn’t.

    “Carrie” closed on Sunday night, two weeks earlier than scheduled, as a result of poor ticket sales after the show opened to mixed to negative reviews. The production by MCC Theater did not earn all its money back. A cast album recording — a theatrical measure of success — has not been announced, though one is said to be in the works. And while the creators of “Carrie” are emphatic that a Broadway transfer was never their hope, Broadway buzz is still a benchmark of any successful Off Broadway show, and in this case the silence was deafening.

    So what went wrong? Or put another way, as some theater bloggers and critics have, was “Carrie” salvageable as a stage musical in the first place?

    Based on the 1974 novel by Stephen King, the musical adaptation has posed theatrical and tonal challenges since its first developmental workshops in the early 1980s. This is, after all, the story of a shy teenager (played in the revival by Molly Ranson) with telekinetic powers who endures emotional abuse from both cruel classmates and her fanatically pious mother, Margaret White (Marin Mazzie). Anxiety and dread are not feelings that most musicals aim to arouse, but they are inevitable in “Carrie” because most audiences know the climax, made famous in the 1976 movie starring Sissy Spacek. Carrie, drenched in pig’s blood by the mean kids at the senior prom, kills them with her powers, then goes home and is stabbed by her mother, whom Carrie kills before dying herself.

    Several theater producers contacted recently said that “Carrie,” no matter how well acted and sung, presented far more than the usual share of difficulties, the most insurmountable being that nearly every character is dead at the end. To be sure, Michael Gore, the composer of “Carrie,” and Dean Pitchford, the musical’s lyricist, had success before, winning an Oscar for best song for the 1980 movie “Fame,” and Lawrence D. Cohen, who wrote the book for this version, had written the screenplay for the “Carrie” film.

    But a musical with so much death and despair is a hard sell in commercial theater these days; even Margaret’s religiosity is wildly out of sync with current Broadway portrayals of faith as comic, romantic or subversive plotlines in “Godspell,” “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “Leap of Faith,” “Sister Act” and “The Book of Mormon.”

    Per the customs of New York theater, none of the producers would speak on the record; few if any producers are ever openly critical of a newly shuttered show produced by colleagues with whom they may work again. But several echoed the theater writer and critic Peter Filichia, who said he believed that “Carrie” was fundamentally unworkable.

    “I see no reason to remount ‘Carrie’ at all,” Mr. Filichia said. “I have no advice on how to make it better. I can’t think of a thing. Mind you, I don’t hate it. I just don’t think it’s worth the effort.”

    Such a conclusion feels like yet another cruelty hurled at “Carrie,” the musical’s three creators said in a telephone interview. They put the onus of the abbreviated Off Broadway run on critics, contending that many of them chose not to assess the revival on its merits but to analyze it through the prism of the Broadway flop. Most major reviews of “Carrie” did compare the two productions, given the infamy of the original and the significant changes to the script and score for the revival.

    Several reviewers complained about certain songs and a one-note blandness in the high school scenes, but the sharpest criticism was that “Carrie” had been de-camped to the point of dullness. Some critics and theater bloggers especially bemoaned the decision by the director Stafford Arima to forgo dumping red liquid over Carrie’s head during the prom. Mr. Arima used projections to convey the blood splattering, which Mr. Cohen termed a “gangbusters choice” and Mr. Pitchford described as a fresh approach that avoided recycling what worked best on film.

    Mr. Gore added: “There are some people who would have been happy if the first two rows of the audience were given slickers and blood got all over them. Some theater companies will do that in the future, I imagine.”

    To that end, the creators and MCC said one successful result of the revival is that the musical would become a licensable property available for productions at high schools, colleges and regional theaters. After the 1988 Broadway production closed, the creators were so devastated that they refused hundreds of requests by directors and theater companies to stage “Carrie” until Mr. Arima pitched his vision. Now the creators are ready to say yes to productions, and are already talking to one — SpeakEasy Stage Company in Boston — about doing “Carrie” next spring.

    Paul Daigneault, the producing artistic director of SpeakEasy, said he found the Off Broadway production “haunting” as well as “a great time,” adding that the musical was a strong fit with his company’s mission of producing socially relevant and cutting-edge theater. (The Pulitzer Prize-winning musical “Next to Normal,” about a depressed mother who attempts suicide, is playing there now.) Mr. Daigneault, who would direct “Carrie,” said he wanted to give “three-dimensionality to all of the characters, even those who don’t have a lot of words, and to explore the vulnerabilities of the major and minor characters.” He said it was too soon to say if he would use liquid blood, but added that he liked Mr. Arima’s projections. (Mr. Daigneault emphasized that his ideas for “Carrie” should not be read as criticism of the Off Broadway run.)

    Mr. Cohen said that the creators would give a free hand to directors and producers on most artistic choices, though he added that “keeping out the absurd camp elements is important because we never want ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’ version of ‘Carrie.’ ” And he rejected the idea that “Carrie” would have worked better as camp, or at least with winks, saying its creators had a different goal.

    “We spent three years revisiting ‘Carrie’ scene by scene, song by song, trying to rescue a show that hadn’t met our dreams the first time,” Mr. Cohen said. “Having faced all the baggage and all the naysayers who said ‘Carrie’ would never happen again onstage, and on a stage in New York no less, we did what we wanted to do — fix the show.

    “To be candid, yes, we’re disappointed that it didn’t run longer,” he added. “But if the experience is bittersweet, it’s more sweet than bitter.”

  15. #40
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    http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Remak...ate-30406.html
    Remakes are so common now that when announced they're almost immediately disregarded. Even circumstances where the project doesn't sound like such a bad idea they're still dismissed and lumped into the unoriginal pile - and often justifiably. Yet there are times when a remake is not only warranted, but the pieces are also put together so perfectly that we should welcome the revisit and/or new interpretation of the material. The upcoming remake of Carrie sounds great and now there's a set release date for Kimberly Peirce's interpretation of the Stephen King novel.

    Coming Soon reports that Screen Gems has plans for Carrie to hit theaters on March 15, 2013. That's not necessarily a date to scoff at since the The Hunger Games just followed a similar schedule (also with a young female lead) and it's currently killing it in with teens at the box office. The 1974 novel was King's fourth book, the first to actually be published, and also the first of many of King's novels brought to the big screen. The original was directed by Brian de Palma and featured unforgettable performances from Sissy Spacek in the titular role and Piper Laurie as her scary, religious fanatic mother. It was announced just at the end of last month that Chloe Moretz is playing the role of Carrie this time around and, even though Spacek left huge shoes to fill (well, they were probably really tiny shoes but she was nominated for an Academy Award), the Let Me In and Kick-Ass actress is the perfect choice to reprise the role.

    Personally, I'm not a fan of De Palma so not only am I excited to see someone else's take on the tale, but Peirce seems almost as an inspired a choice as Moretz. Her first film, Boys Don't Cry, was a solid debut, featuring some truly exceptional performances and I'm interested to see what she can get from the young actress who caught everyone's attention with her turn as the precocious sister in (500) Days of Summer. Not to mention, the revenge tale of a pubescent girl with telekinetic powers seems like a project best suited for a female director. Perhaps even more important than having a woman direct The Hunger Games sequel? An issue on everyone's mind lately.

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    http://bloody-disgusting.com/news/22...psycho-mother/
    Back in the original 1976 adaptation of Carrie, Piper Laurie played Margaret White, the insane mother of poor Carrie. While it turns out she was right on the money, Margaret was an insanely abusive parent that further drove Carrie into the film’s climactic events. What actress carries enough prowess to take on such a emotional role in the Kimberly Peirce-directed reboot.

    Bloody Disgusting got exclusive inside word that Columbia Pictures is speaking closely with Julianne Moore for the titular role. Moore is no stranger to the genre having starred alongside Hannibal Lecter in Hannibal and has also played Lila Crane in the Psycho remake. She is currently working on the exorcism fantasy The Seventh Son for Warners.

    Chloe Moretz stars as Carrie in the reboot going behind cameras for a March 13, 2013 release.

    The thriller is “An adaptation of the Stephen King thriller about the hyperkinetic teenager who gets pushed too far at the prom and wreaks havoc on her fellow high school students.” King’s bestselling book was turned into the 1976 film that starred Sissy Spacek, John Travolta, Amy Irving and Piper Laurie as the repressive mother. On Carrie, Aguirre-Sacasa writes a version that is more faithful to the King book than the earlier movie.

  17. #42
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    i cant find any confirmation anywhere, but i read earlier that the choice for Carrie's mother is now set as.. Julianne Moore.
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  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbertwest View Post
    i cant find any confirmation anywhere, but i read earlier that the choice for Carrie's mother is now set as.. Julianne Moore.
    That story is right above your post

  19. #44
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    No, cause your text says :
    "Bloody Disgusting got exclusive inside word that Columbia Pictures is speaking closely with Julianne Moore for the titular role"

    Apparently she GOT the role.. but i dont find anything about it..
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  20. #45
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    http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=89713
    Already a familiar talent to horror fans for her vampiric turn in Matt Reeves' Let Me In, Chloe Moretz teams with director Tim Burton for the upcoming Dark Shadows and ComingSoon.net had a chance to speak with the young star. We'll have the full interview available soon, but we also got a few details about Moretz's upcoming role as the titular Carrie in Kimberly Peirce's big screen remake.

    "I start that June 1st," says Moretz. "...It's going to be very well done. I don't want to jinx it, but [Peirce] is a genius, genius, genius director. I would never do it with someone that I don't trust. I trust her more than a lot of the directors I've worked with. She's the right woman for the job."

    Released in 1974, "Carrie" was Stephen King's first published novel and tells the story of a high school girl who, through telekinetic powers, takes revenge on peers that have mocked her. Though Brian De Palma directed a highly-acclaimed film version in 1976, Moretz says that Peirce's take sticks more closely to King's text.

    "I'm actually not looking at the original," she says, "even though De Palma's movie was one of the best movies ever made. It's completely iconic and I'm proud to be able to be doing a retooling of it. We're kind of going off the book. It's darker and much more psychological. More 'Black Swan.' You're really looking into her mind and it really looks into the relationship of Margaret and Carrie. It's set in modern time, so it's a lot different."

    The role of Margaret White (Carrie's mother) was played by Piper Laurie in De Palma's version, earning the actress an Academy Award nomination. Last week, word broke that Julianne Moore had been offered the part for the new film.

    Most intriguing of Moretz's comments about the upcoming project was the hint that her Carrie White would offer a very different look for her, physically.

    "It's something that's very different from me," Moretz says of Carrie's wardrobe. "It's an out of body thing. I'm becoming a totally different person for it. I'm letting go of all of my self-esteem issues and just kind of going into it. You have to."

    Although shooting won't begin for another month, Moretz and Peirce have already been impressed with the outpouring of fan support and, in particular, the fan-made poster pictured above. Designed by Pierre-Luc Boucher, the teaser was posted to his Deviant Art page and soon found its way to Peirce.

    "That was a cool poster!" Moretz laughs. "Kim sent that to me. She said, 'Oh my god, you've got to look at this. It's really, really, really cool!' We both felt so pumped. Now we're chomping at the bit to get in there."

    Carrie is scheduled for release on March 15, 2013. Check back for updates as they become available and catch Dark Shadows in theaters on May 11th.

  21. #46
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    http://www.theinsider.com/movies/521...he_New_Carrie/
    Dark Shadows star Chloe Grace Moretz is excited to be the new Carrie, starting work on June 1 in Toronto on the new adaptation of the classic Stephen King novel. But one major voice has been silent about the casting choice, and that's original Carrie Sissy Spacek – until now.

    "I think she's a wonderful actress," Spacek tells ComingSoon.net while promoting her new memoir, My Extraordinary Ordinary Life, adding of the idea that Julianne Moore would be playing the role of Carrie's mother originated by Piper Laurie, "That's great!"

    Boys Don't Cry director Kimberly Pierce will helm the MGM remake based on King's first published novel about a shy high school student whose home life is hell, thanks to her oppressive, overly religious mother, and wreaks havoc at the prom with her telekinetic powers. Spacek earned an Oscar nomination for the Brian De Palma-directed, 1976 original.

    "They hired a really wonderful director, very talented," says Spacek. "It'll be interesting. Our film, it is what it is what it is, and it stood the test of time, but I think that's great, it's like an homage not only to the book but to the film, not only to Stephen King but to Brian De Palma. … The first audience of Carrie has aged now, so I think out of curiosity, I think it's cool. As I understand it, they're not remaking our film; they're going back to the source material, to the book."

    Of the 1976 Carrie, Spacek observes, "People go, 'Oh my God, that was so scary,' but really, it was scary like 'Boo!' -- at the end, when the arm comes out -- but there's so much humor in it. It was just one of those serendipitous things with everybody that worked on that, everybody that Brian brought together, brought something to it. He had a real handle on it and he knew what he wanted."

    As for her favorite scene, she shares, "The scene in the kitchen where Piper Laurie is struck with all those kitchen utensils. It's so scary, it's so horrifying, but it's ridiculous. I just love that, and that was back in the old days when they came out on wires and then they reversed the film…"

    Spacek suggested that she'll probably go to see the new Carrie when it comes out, but didn't mention whether or not she had been approached to do a cameo.

  22. #47
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    So, with the new version of CARRIE, i am pretty sure that a publisher will take that opportunity to release a new version. Do you think that there will be any additional material?
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  23. #48
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    I don't think there's any extra material when it comes to Carrie the novel.

  24. #49
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    http://www.playbill.com/news/article...l-Be-Published
    The revised Off-Broadway production of Carrie, the pop musical based on Stephen King's 1974 novel about a teenage girl with telekinetic powers, will be licensed for live performance by R&H Theatricals.

    R&H, which also licenses the Rodgers and Hammerstein catalogue, in addition to such new musicals as In the Heights and The Light in the Piazza, did not announce a release date for the live theatrical rights, though the organization is eager to have Carrie on the market in the near future. Visit RNH.com to sign up for e-mail alerts on Carrie's availability.

    In addition, a piano vocal selections book from Carrie, to be published by Imagem Music/Hal Leonard, is due later this year.

    The original 1988 writing team of Academy Award-winning composer Michael Gore ("Fame," "Terms of Endearment"), Academy Award-winning lyricist Dean Pitchford ("Fame," "Footloose") and "Carrie" film screenwriter Lawrence D. Cohen returned to work on Carrie, which was shaped by director Stafford Arima (Altar Boyz, Tin Pan Alley Rag, London's Ragtime) as a more intimate tale of parental control, bullying and school politics.

    Carrie began Off-Broadway previews Jan. 31 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre and officially opened March 1. A four-week extension through April 22 was announced in late February, but MCC Theater cut the extension short to April 8.

    "We couldn't be happier that our new version of Carrie will at last be sent out into the world to continue its adventure and journey of resurrection," the writers said in a statement. "We're especially proud that our musical of Stephen King's iconic fable – with its emotionally driven narrative and strong contemporary resonances – will be a part of a stellar catalog alongside the classics of Rodgers and Hammerstein."

    The announcement from R&H Theatricals comes 24-years to the date that the Broadway production of Carrie shuttered after a troubled, 21-performance run at the Virginia Theatre on May 15, 1988. While various theatre companies expressed interested in staging the property since that time, the authors did not release the rights and chose to put the musical to rest until the recent MCC run.

    Less so than the infamous 1988 Broadway outing (a mix of spectacle, camp and emotional drama), the recent MCC Theater revival of Carrie also left critics divided on the new, more palatable take on the musical tale of a bullied telekinetic teen who destroys her prom. The press singled out stars Tony Award nominee Marin Mazzie (Next to Normal, Passion, Ragtime) and Molly Ranson (Jerusalem, August: Osage County) for their performances as Margaret and Carrie, respectively.

    The Off-Broadway revival preserved much of the short-lived original 1988 Broadway musical material penned for the characters of Carrie and Margaret, while a handful of new songs were added for the ensemble and supporting characters.

    Ghostlight Records will release a cast album of Carrie in the coming months.

    Click here to see the Playbill Vault feature on the original production of Carrie.

    The Playbill for the revised Off-Broadway production lists the following songs:

    Act I
    "In"
    "Carrie"
    "Open Your Heart"
    "And Eve Was Weak"
    "The World According to Chris"
    "Evening Prayers"
    "Dreamer In Disguise"
    "Once You See"
    "Unsuspecting Hearts"
    "Do Me a Favor"
    "I Remember How Those Boys Could Dance"

    Act II
    "A Night We'll Never Forget"
    "You Shine"
    "Why Not Me?"
    "Stay Here Instead"
    "When There's No One"
    "The Prom"
    "Carrie" (reprise)
    Epilogue

  25. #50
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    http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Judy-...les-31416.html
    We reported pretty enthusiastically last month that Judy Greer, the actress known for roles both comic (Arrested Development) and more heartfelt (last year's The Descendants) had signed on to play the gym teacher in Carrie, the new planned adaptation of Stephen King's classic novel. After reporting it we were told by the studio's reps that no casting decision had in fact been made, so we had to put our enthusiasm for Greer on hold for a little while.

    Now, apparently all the contracts have been signed, and the news is free to get out there at last. MGM has confirmed today that Greer will indeed play the sympathetic gym teacher Miss Desjardin, and that Portia Doubleday has also been confirmed as Chris Hargensen, the girl responsible for a lot of teasing and suffering Carrie endures, including the famous bucket of pig's blood dumped on her at prom. While you'll have no trouble recognizing Greer thanks to her extensive film and TV work, Doubleday is more of a newcomer; she appeared opposite Michael Cera in Youth in Revolt, and more recently was on the short-lived TV series Mr. Sunshine. You also won't have too much trouble believing she's able to torment Carrie, played by Chloe Moretz-- Moretz is a 15-year-old playing pretty close to her actual age, while Doubleday is 24.

    With Kimberly Peirce set to direct and Julianne Moore also starring as Carrie's obsessive, not-quite-all-there mom, Carrie is all set to go into production this summer in time to meet its March 15, 2013 release. We still don't really know how it can hold a candle to Brian de Palma's original adaptation, and Sissy Spacek's unforgettable performance as Carrie, but the cast is strong enough so far that we at least want to see how it turns out.

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