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Thread: What are you currently reading?

  1. #17001
    Rabid Billybumbler Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell's Avatar

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    Finished Black Mad Wheel by Josh Malerman. It was decent and a page turner...til the end. The end may not have been to my liking but overall, good book.
    Started The Shuddering today, loving it so far.
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  2. #17002
    Manni Folken ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan's Avatar

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    I am reading 'What Can the Bible Teach Us?' and although I find it interesting, I will NOT throw half of my book and movie collection in the fire to purge all the demonic and satanic influences from my life. I hope this doesn't mean I can't live on Paradise Earth after the Apocalypse though. I'm living a good life otherwise.
    I'm sure if there is intelligent life somewhere out there in the universe, they are wise enough to stay away from us.

    And the people bowed and prayed, to the cell phone god they made...

  3. #17003
    Gunslinger Apprentice Aremag has a spectacular aura about Aremag has a spectacular aura about Aremag has a spectacular aura about Aremag's Avatar

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    Just started Muse by James Renner. Don't know anything about the author or book, it was one of the CD grab bag books.

  4. #17004
    Vagrant Dead WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future

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    Only Forward didn't survive the deadly collision with my coffee so now I'm reading Shadows Vol. 1, edited by Charles Grant.

  5. #17005
    Vagrant Dead WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future

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    I gave Gwendy's Magic Feather a try. I liked King's introduction but didn't make it too far into the story before I realized I don't really care about Gwendy, her button box and her magic feather.

  6. #17006
    Manni Folken ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan's Avatar

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    Am I the only person in this universe who liked Gwendy's Magic Feather? (And I'm not even in her political party!)
    I'm sure if there is intelligent life somewhere out there in the universe, they are wise enough to stay away from us.

    And the people bowed and prayed, to the cell phone god they made...

  7. #17007
    Rabid Billybumbler Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell's Avatar

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    Possibly.
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  8. #17008
    Gunslinger Apprentice Aremag has a spectacular aura about Aremag has a spectacular aura about Aremag has a spectacular aura about Aremag's Avatar

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    Just started Carrie which I don't think I've read since the late 70s.

  9. #17009
    Big Coffin Hunter Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861 people like to rub elbows with me Brian861's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by ur2ndbiggestfan View Post
    Am I the only person in this universe who liked Gwendy's Magic Feather? (And I'm not even in her political party!)
    Short answer? Yep.
    "I’m goddamned Luke Skywalker. Except with far better books."-Jeffingoff

  10. #17010
    Vagrant Dead WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future

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    Finished Dark Advent by Brian Hodge, started Eye by David J. Schow.

    DA was pretty shameless in, ahem, drawing inspiration from The Stand and Swan Song. Good story, fast pacing, interesting characters, and despite some clunky writing, this was pretty enjoyable.

  11. #17011
    Live it. webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000 seldom gets put on hold webstar1000's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by WeDealInLead View Post
    Finished Dark Advent by Brian Hodge, started Eye by David J. Schow.

    DA was pretty shameless in, ahem, drawing inspiration from The Stand and Swan Song. Good story, fast pacing, interesting characters, and despite some clunky writing, this was pretty enjoyable.
    Dark Advent sounds interesting. I may grab this after I finish Rosemarys Baby!
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  12. #17012
    Along the Path of the Beam Tony Two-Cent will become famous soon enough Tony Two-Cent's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by WeDealInLead View Post
    Finished Dark Advent by Brian Hodge, started Eye by David J. Schow.

    DA was pretty shameless in, ahem, drawing inspiration from The Stand and Swan Song. Good story, fast pacing, interesting characters, and despite some clunky writing, this was pretty enjoyable.
    I have heard great things about Dark Advent from people whose opinions I trust and I have the signed/limited from Cemetery Dance. I need to move this one up to the top of my TBR pile as I love both The Stand and Swan Song.

  13. #17013
    Vagrant Dead WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Two-Cent View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by WeDealInLead View Post
    Finished Dark Advent by Brian Hodge, started Eye by David J. Schow.

    DA was pretty shameless in, ahem, drawing inspiration from The Stand and Swan Song. Good story, fast pacing, interesting characters, and despite some clunky writing, this was pretty enjoyable.
    I have heard great things about Dark Advent from people whose opinions I trust and I have the signed/limited from Cemetery Dance. I need to move this one up to the top of my TBR pile as I love both The Stand and Swan Song.
    That's the one I have too. There's no way you won't like it. My "review" was positive despite the "clunky writing" comment. If you've read any recent Hodge (say, last five books), you'll notice the difference. It's a little like reading McCammon's mid to current bibliography vs the first couple mass paperback horror yarns.

  14. #17014
    Maerlyn's Imp Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack has much to be proud of Hunchback Jack's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by WeDealInLead View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Two-Cent View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by WeDealInLead View Post
    Finished Dark Advent by Brian Hodge, started Eye by David J. Schow.

    DA was pretty shameless in, ahem, drawing inspiration from The Stand and Swan Song. Good story, fast pacing, interesting characters, and despite some clunky writing, this was pretty enjoyable.
    I have heard great things about Dark Advent from people whose opinions I trust and I have the signed/limited from Cemetery Dance. I need to move this one up to the top of my TBR pile as I love both The Stand and Swan Song.
    That's the one I have too. There's no way you won't like it. My "review" was positive despite the "clunky writing" comment. If you've read any recent Hodge (say, last five books), you'll notice the difference. It's a little like reading McCammon's mid to current bibliography vs the first couple mass paperback horror yarns.
    Huh, I have this one too. Maybe I should move it to my "to read" pile, if it's good.

    I just finished The Bone Tree by Greg Iles. It was enjoyable, and had some very tense scenes, but it was also a bit draggy, and my disbelief was suspended about as low as it would go in parts. It also suffered a bit from the syndrome of "The bad guys are bad because they break the law, but when the good guys break the law, that's okay, because they're the good guys".

    The final book in the trilogy is "Mississippi Blood", but next up is "The Peripheral" (reread) and "Agency", both by William Gibson.

    Gibson's prose is very distinctive - there's a lot of very specific world-building detail, and very future-term-laden dialogue, that you need to piece together to get a picture of what is going on. It sometimes helps to reread chapters after reading subsequent chapters, just to reinterpret them. There are also a lot of chapters that don't move the story forward much; they just give a new interesting glimpse into another facet of the world, just to reveal what's there because it's a neat idea. You kind of just have to go with that.

    Gibson is one of my favourite authors. After 40 years, he's still writing stuff that's compelling and enjoyable, and unlike anyone else's work. He still has the uncanny ability of foreseeing how present-day emerging tech might become commonplace - cool and exciting to us, but utterly everyday to his characters.

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  15. #17015
    Manni Folken ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan has a brilliant future ur2ndbiggestfan's Avatar

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    I've started reading THE NIGHT DOCTOR AND OTHER TALES by Steve Rasnic Tem, and I must admit I usually don't care for these type of, I think metaphorical is the right word, sort of stories, with hazy details that don't really fit into reality. The stories are readable though and I'm not halfway through yet. I also admit I don't fully understand the point or lessons of them. The ones I've read seem to be about getting old and losing interest in life and your loved ones (living or deceased) and just letting go. Kind of depressing.
    I'm sure if there is intelligent life somewhere out there in the universe, they are wise enough to stay away from us.

    And the people bowed and prayed, to the cell phone god they made...

  16. #17016
    The Tenant Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean's Avatar

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    I currently read Agatha Christie in German, Italian and Spanish. One book in one language, another in the next, etc

    it's absolutely divine. The point is, when one wants to activate his reading skills in a language he doesn't know very well and tries to improve, it may be hard to find something both interesting and not very hard. I broke my mind trying to find such books in all those languages. For example, I would love to read Kafka and E.T.A.Hofmann, but my German is not yet up to the task.

    Well, Christie is perfect. Her language has this classical simplicity and clarity that is easily translated into other languages (I noticed it first when a friend of mine read her in French and I peeked to see if the translation was adequate; it was). Her stories are captivating, and her storytelling impeccable.

    So, the bottomline is: if you are studying a language and looking for something to read - with pleasure! - to enhance your reading skills, start with Christie, and laugh in the face of those who'll tell you you have to read original literature only. After all, she was translated by native speakers of the language you are going to read her in, it's not like you'll be reading something counterfeited.

    (or choose any other author who possesses the same clarity of language. To be avoided till later: anything archaic; anything language-centered; any author famous for his peculiar style or specific sense of humor. To be shunned forever: anything adapted; anything boring.)

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  17. #17017
    Dr Emmett Brown Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave is a splendid one to behold Girlystevedave's Avatar

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    Finally started The Outsider yesterday.

  18. #17018
    Vagrant Dead WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future

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    Re: Christie and clarity of language. There is a reason why Wells, Verne, Doyle, Carroll, Christie, and to a lesser degree, Poe, Nabokov, and Lovecraft still sell millions worldwide. Their works are still relatable and moreover, pure language that won't break a translator's mind. I'm sure translating King is a sweet paying gig but I couldn't imagine how one goes about making sense of the rural Maine vernacular, colloquium, and all the idioms we rely on to get through the day. This isn't strictly a translation problem, I've heard and read right on this forum comments such as "Who speaks that way?" in regards to some of King's characters. Yes, I absolutely get why he writes them that way, but really, what's "Ayuh" in Greek? You can adequately translate it but that's NOT what the character said.

    Anyway, I'm rereading The Road, and as dense and demanding it can be, I'm sort of translating it in my head as I'm going and it's no problem, it's pure language and I can do it almost literally and lose none of its tone.

  19. #17019
    Rabid Billybumbler Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell has much to be proud of Garrell's Avatar

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    Finished The Shuddering by Ania Ahlborn. Loved it, better than Seed. Great fun story.
    Started Blaze for the first time.
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  20. #17020
    Rabid Billybumbler St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy's Avatar

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    I haven't posted in this thread in about 3 months, so it's time for a series of dull missives on what I've been up to since then:

    Everyone knows Dickens' A Christmas Carol; that was one of his 5 "Christmas Books" (often collected under that title), but he also had a collection of "Christmas Stories" (stories published around Christmastime each year), which is often broken into 2 volumes. Last year I purchased a limited (2000 produced) leather-bound two-volume set of Christmas Stories, and read them from 11/13 - 12/18. I've been unable to determine the year of publication, but it may be around 1950 or 1952. I managed to find a set that was damn near immaculate; they are beautiful, and look like this (although this is not my copy):



    ...but on to the books themselves:

    It turned out (a bit disappointingly) that most of the content actually isn't Christmas-related, although each work dwells on the themes Dickens would have his readership contemplate around Christmas (be good to your fellow man, damn it!), replete with his usual helping of unexpected coincidences and resolutions, but other than that, the collection was generally entertaining (certainly for anyone who enjoys his style, as I do).

    Strangely, the collection contains works (The Perils Of Certain English Prisoners and A Message From The Sea) for which Dickens only wrote part of the story - and skipped the bits he didn't write! I don't know if other collections handle these works the same way.

    The Child's Story is one that will seem quite mawkish to those lacking a taste for Dickens' tendency to grasp for emotional reactions, but if you're feeling sensitive at all, it may just reduce you to a blubbering heap.

    Going Into Society was an interesting one, about a dwarf that works at a carnival.

    Tom Tiddler's Ground contains something that is mighty interesting indeed. First, consider the role of ghosts in fiction long ago, long before King, back to the 19th century (TTG is from 1861). I'm not an expert on the topic, but my reading experience matches what I've heard said about the use of ghosts, and that is that they generally weren't objects of fright, but indicators of sadness and tragedy; indeed, much of what we regard as early horror is actually more accurately termed "gothic," which has more of a focus on tragedy (some, such as certain bits of Poe, almost amusingly so) and not so much fear. Anyway - Tom Tiddler's Ground doesn't have ghosts ("bah!" I hear you exclaim; "then what is this?" - I'm getting there), nor is it horror or gothic ("bah!" you interject again), but I'm trying to set the stage for what TTG isn't, what Dickens isn't, and what really didn't even exist at that time even if it were what is now regarded as early horror - the idea of the type of scare contemporary readers and movie viewers expect and enjoy. So, given all that, lay your eyes upon this passage from Tom Tiddler's Ground:

    “When the house door closed with a bang and a shake, it seemed to Miss Kimmeens to be a very heavy house door, shutting her up in a wilderness of a house. …she thought she would go all over the house, to make sure that nobody with a great-coat on and a carving-knife in it, had got under one of the beds or into one of the cupboards. Not that she had ever before been troubled by the image of anybody armed with a great-coat and a carving-knife, but that it seemed to have been shaken into existence by the shake and the bang of the great street door, reverberating through the solitary house. So, little Miss Kimmeens looked under the five empty beds of the five departed pupils, and looked under her own bed, and looked under Miss Pupford’s bed, and looked under Miss Pupford’s assistant’s bed. And when she had done this, and was making the tour of the cupboards, the disagreeable thought came into her young head, What a very alarming thing it would be to find somebody with a mask on, like Guy Fawkes, hiding bolt upright in a corner and pretending not to be alive!”
    Although written in 19th century style, that's all like a horror movie of the last 40 or 50 years; someone hiding with a knife could be Halloween or Friday the 13th, and the bit about a motionless mask-wearing intruder is like a scene out of the TV show The Following (which was horror, at least in part). I was pretty blown away by this seeming anticipation of horror tropes that still lay a century away.

    [I will mention that Dickens' The Signal Man (which is more properly part of Mugby Junction but is occasionally published by itself) is a bit of a ghost story in the sense we know it, however still nothing like the previous passage.]

    No Thoroughfare was exciting and truly had a bit of everything (the shadow of the past, hope for the future, a mystery or two, and conflict aplenty) to the point that you may need a diagram to follow along.

    Some amusing quotes:

    “…and then we go to bed. Our room is a very old room. …We don’t like the portrait of a cavalier in green, over the fireplace. There are great black beams in the ceiling, and there is a great black bedstead, supported at the foot by two great black figures, who seem to have come off a couple of tombs in the old baronial church in the park, for our particular accommodation. But, we are not a superstitious nobleman, and we don’t mind. …At length we go to bed. Well! we can’t sleep. The embers on the hearth burn fitfully and make the room look ghostly. We can’t help peeping out over the counterpane, at the two black figures and the cavalier—that wicked-looking cavalier—in green. In the flickering light they seem to advance and retire: which, though we are not by any means a superstitious nobleman, is not agreeable.”

    “As to the beef, it’s shameful. It’s not beef. Regular beef isn’t veins.”

    “…when the fellows began to come back, not wanting to, he was always glad to see them; which was aggravating when they were not at all glad to see him, and so he got his head knocked against walls…”

    [Note: a "bustard" is a large game bird.]

    “Resolved to capture him or perish in the attempt, he closed with the bustard; but the bustard, who had formed a counter-resolution that he should do neither, threw him, stunned him, and was last seen making off due west.”

    “…he says, ‘I can’t imagine, Mr. Magsman’—which he never could imagine nothing, and was monotonous company.”

    “You may suppose you can, but you cannot; or you may go so far as to say you do, but you do not.”

    “…being worked into a state I put on my best bonnet and gloves and parasol with the child in my hand and I says ‘Miss Wozenham I little thought every to have entered your house but unless my grandson’s cap is instantly restored, the laws of this country regulating the property of the Subject shall at length decide betwixt yourself and me, cost what it may.’ With a sneer upon her face…she rang the bell and she says ‘Jane, is there a street-child’s old cap down Airy?’ I says ‘Miss Wozenham before your housemaid answers that questions you must allow me to inform you to your face that my grandson is not a street-child and is not in the habit of wearing old caps. In fact’ I says ‘Miss Wozenham I am far from sure that my grandson’s cap may not be newer than your own’ which was perfectly savage in me, her lace being the commonest machine-make washed and torn besides, but I had been put into a state to begin with fomented by impertinence.”

    “The case was now desperate. Two serious considerations presented themselves to Vendale. Was it possible to put Madame Dor into the stove?”

    “My admirable friend alone possessed his composure. He sent out, on the spot, for a bottle of wine.”

    “…he had no stimulating refreshment about him but a small packet of clammy gingerbread nuts…”

    “Is this the top? No, nothing like the top. It is an aggravating peculiarity of all mountains, that, although they have only one top when they are seen (as they ought always to be seen) from below, they turn out to have a perfect eruption of false tops whenever the traveller is sufficiently ill-advised to go out of his way for the purpose of ascending them.”

    “Whenever the ball came near him, he thought of his shins, and got out of the way immediately.”

    “…the two idle apprentices followed the donkey until the night was far advanced. Whether he was recaptured by the town-council, or is bolting at this hour through the United Kingdom, they know not. They hope he may still be bolting; if so, their best wishes are with him.”

    “No fine lady requires more constant waiting-on than a horse. Other animals can make their own toilette: he must have a groom. You will tell me that this is because we want to make his coat artificially glossy. Glossy! Come home with me, and see my cat,—my clever cat, who can groom herself!”
    Grasping for memories, searching for landmarks in fields once familiar

    He can’t recognise now, the hedgerows are gone, the blackbirds have flown, silencing song

    This wasteland belongs to a murder of crows

  21. #17021
    Rabid Billybumbler St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy's Avatar

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    From 12/18 - 12/19 I read The Greatest Gift by Philip Van Doren Stern. Although only 54 pages long, this was the basis of the movie It's A Wonderful Life.

    The vast majority of the movie's story is not to be found here (it is no novel; it was originally a 24-page pamphlet sent as a type of Christmas card in 1943), but what is here, however, is effective as a short description of the main points of the film; it’s easy to see why its emotion and charm landed with people and spurred the movie (which did an excellent job fleshing things out without obscuring the point). We don’t see George living his life, but only his initial bridge encounter with Clarence (who goes unnamed, known only as "the stranger") and resulting encounters with places, things, and people no longer bearing traces of George because he was never born. Upon discovering that he’d been better off with his life than without it, he seeks out “the stranger,” puts things back as they were, and all is again well.

    The illustrations (fantastic green woodcuts from Andrew Davidson, who's also done the Bacardi bat logo as well as exquisite black and white Harry Potter covers you may or may not have seen) were simple and evocative; the whole book, physically, was quite Christmassy. The afterword (written by the author’s daughter) was informative and a nice addition. Anyone with the slightest Christmas spirit should check out this edition: https://www.amazon.com/Greatest-Gift...s=books&sr=1-2
    Grasping for memories, searching for landmarks in fields once familiar

    He can’t recognise now, the hedgerows are gone, the blackbirds have flown, silencing song

    This wasteland belongs to a murder of crows

  22. #17022
    Rabid Billybumbler St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy has much to be proud of St. Troy's Avatar

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    From 12/19 - 12/23, I had my annual re-read of A Christmas Carol (which presumably you know all about).
    Grasping for memories, searching for landmarks in fields once familiar

    He can’t recognise now, the hedgerows are gone, the blackbirds have flown, silencing song

    This wasteland belongs to a murder of crows

  23. #17023
    The Tenant Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by WeDealInLead View Post
    Re: Christie and clarity of language. There is a reason why Wells, Verne, Doyle, Carroll, Christie, and to a lesser degree, Poe, Nabokov, and Lovecraft still sell millions worldwide. Their works are still relatable and moreover, pure language that won't break a translator's mind.
    Precisely

    I'm sure translating King is a sweet paying gig but I couldn't imagine how one goes about making sense of the rural Maine vernacular, colloquium, and all the idioms we rely on to get through the day. This isn't strictly a translation problem, I've heard and read right on this forum comments such as "Who speaks that way?" in regards to some of King's characters. Yes, I absolutely get why he writes them that way, but really, what's "Ayuh" in Greek? You can adequately translate it but that's NOT what the character said.
    Yes and no. Vernacular can be reproduced, provided the translator is really good; Dickens, Twain, many others have found their adequate translations by fantastically talented Russian translators (don't know about any languages), I read them all in Russian as a child and reread later in the original, so can testify to it. King provides other kinds of difficulties; as I read him, I sometimes think: oh good Lord, how happy I am that I don't have to translate him! Things like Redrum. Like a hundread meanings of Drawing. And so on. At every page.

    Then again, provided the translator is really good and talented... of course, just as it's the case with vernacular, it is going to be a totally different text. So, yes, if Christie and even Poe can be translated, writers like King (Dickens, Twain, Wodehouse...) can only be reproduced, re-invented by a talent of a comparable magnitude. Which is, alas, so rare. We used to have a fantastic school of translation here, but now it has deteriorated along with everything else.

    Ask not what bears can do for you, but what you can do for bears. (razz)
    When one is in agreement with bears one is always correct. (mae)

    bears are back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  24. #17024
    The Tenant Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean has much to be proud of Jean's Avatar

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    St. Troy: everyone who reads Dickens these days conquers bears' heart forever!

    Ask not what bears can do for you, but what you can do for bears. (razz)
    When one is in agreement with bears one is always correct. (mae)

    bears are back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  25. #17025
    Vagrant Dead WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future WeDealInLead has a brilliant future

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    Edward Bryant & Harlan Ellison - Phoenix Without Ashes. Yes, this too has an introduction rant about Ellison being screwed over by yet another Hollywood exec. This was an endearing quality for the first sixteen times, now it's just mentally exhausting. Like, I read the introduction and now I'm taking a break before I start the book proper.

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