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View Full Version : How much Stephen King have you read?



jhanic
06-19-2014, 07:57 AM
Here's a rather interesting quiz that someone on the SKMB posted:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/louispeitzman/how-much-stephen-king-have-you-read

I scored 72 out of the 72.

John

ELazansky
06-19-2014, 07:59 AM
Only 54 for me.

sentinel
06-19-2014, 08:12 AM
72 out of 72 for me too, not sure why they has some short stories mixed in. -K

Jean
06-19-2014, 08:15 AM
65

actually, 66, because I fully intend to finish Mr.Mercedes. This figure is not very likely to grow, however, until Mr.King writes something else. Maybe I'll add Throttle sooner or later, but the other five are two baseball books, and three I could never finish, and don't think I will.

mae
06-19-2014, 08:35 AM
Which ones couldn't you finish, Jean? And why?

becca69
06-19-2014, 08:47 AM
I have 68. Haven't read the baseball books (probably will never read them) and haven't finished On Writing or Danse Macabre.

Dan
06-19-2014, 08:49 AM
65

jhanic
06-19-2014, 09:14 AM
Thanks, mods, for moving this here. I wasn't sure where to post it.

John

WeDealInLead
06-19-2014, 09:25 AM
All those except Faithful and Regulators. Not sure why UR and In the Tall Grass got a mention but something longer like The Little Sisters of Eluria didn't. Oh well.

mae
06-19-2014, 09:46 AM
Not sure why UR and In the Tall Grass got a mention but something longer like The Little Sisters of Eluria didn't. Oh well.

Because they both were released as standalone ebooks (like Riding the Bullet).

Lookwhoitis
06-19-2014, 09:52 AM
lol what if you cant remember? :D

CyberGhostface
06-19-2014, 10:19 AM
Full list for me.

Jean
06-19-2014, 10:20 AM
Which ones couldn't you finish, Jean? And why?oh, but you know http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k291/mishemplushem/Facilitation/bear_wink-1.gif (http://s91.photobucket.com/user/mishemplushem/media/Facilitation/bear_wink-1.gif.html)

1. The Running Man. Was reading it on the plane, and when the flight was over, there still were 20 or so pages left. At home, another two or three books were waiting for me, so I picked those up instead, to find out later that I irretrievably lost interest towards TRM.
2. The Green Mile. Was reading it in Paris, all the time dreaming to buy some other book instead. As soon as found another book in my favorite bookstore at St.Michel, abandoned TGM forever (more than halfway through)
3. On Writing. This one was just so boring and pointless that I lay it aside as soon as I fully realized it wasn't going to get any better (about one third in)

WeDealInLead
06-19-2014, 11:16 AM
Not sure why UR and In the Tall Grass got a mention but something longer like The Little Sisters of Eluria didn't. Oh well.

Because they both were released as standalone ebooks (like Riding the Bullet).

In the Tall Grass was a magazine appearance first which IMO makes it even less qualified for this list than LSoF which appeared in an actual book. Among other authors, not rock stars and ads for this and that. And it's still uncollected. And it's not a collaboration.

Ricky
06-19-2014, 03:14 PM
52 for me (after I finish Mr. Mercedes).

Lookwhoitis
06-19-2014, 05:55 PM
I'm surprised I only got 46!

What is even more surprising is that I cant really remember if I have read all of the early novels or not. I think I may have but memory is foggy. I will put an * in front of those I cant remember. It may be I read them so young my recollection has faded.

So here is my "to be read list"

Carrie*
Salem's Lot*
The Shining*
Night Shift*
The Dead Zone*
Danse Macabre*

The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon*
Riding the Bullet
Wolves of the Calla
Song of Susannah
The Dark Tower
Faithful
Lisey's Story
Blaze
Just After Sunset
UR
Throttle
Blockade Billy
Mile 81
11/22/63
The Wind Through the Keyhole
A Face in the Crowd
In the Tall Grass
Joyland
Doctor Sleep
Mr. Mercedes

Tommy
06-19-2014, 07:27 PM
56 for me

mattgreenbean
06-19-2014, 07:53 PM
43. Still a bunch of early ones that I've held off, saving them for last.

Odetta
06-19-2014, 08:06 PM
Only 39 for me!

Haven't really read any new stuff... Under the Dome was the newest one, I think

Jon
06-19-2014, 11:26 PM
Which ones couldn't you finish, Jean? And why?oh, but you know http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k291/mishemplushem/Facilitation/bear_wink-1.gif (http://s91.photobucket.com/user/mishemplushem/media/Facilitation/bear_wink-1.gif.html)

1. The Running Man. Was reading it on the plane, and when the flight was over, there still were 20 or so pages left. At home, another two or three books were waiting for me, so I picked those up instead, to find out later that I irretrievably lost interest towards TRM.
2. The Green Mile. Was reading it in Paris, all the time dreaming to buy some other book instead. As soon as found another book in my favorite bookstore at St.Michel, abandoned TGM forever (more than halfway through)
3. On Writing. This one was just so boring and pointless that I lay it aside as soon as I fully realized it wasn't going to get any better (about one third in)

Brother Bear: you are missing a couple of small gems... save "On Writing."

I got a 66. I cannot get through "Thinner." I have made 2 attempts.

I question this...poll as it leaves out at least "Little Sisters."

stroppygoblin
06-20-2014, 02:18 AM
71 and 3/4.

(Still reading Mr Mercedes - would have finished it on the plane, but I have a serious Breaking Bad addiction right now)

mae
06-20-2014, 03:05 AM
Little Sisters wasn't published as a standalone book and it's part of Everything's Eventual.

WeDealInLead
06-20-2014, 05:12 AM
Little Sisters wasn't published as a standalone book and it's part of Everything's Eventual.

In the The Tall grass isn't a standalone either. It's just one of many uncollected stories, nothing more. It's not even an e-book original.

If you're considering book format as a qualifier for the list, than also missing are Guns, an e-book original as well as uncollected.

My point is that that list is pretty arbitrary and including a single short story among his books (and e-book originals, even if one is missing) is pretty odd.

mae
06-20-2014, 05:28 AM
In the Tall Grass was published as a standalone ebook. I'm not saying it's a perfect list but I can see their logic, which is strange, granted.

webstar1000
06-20-2014, 05:39 AM
71 and 3/4.

(Still reading Mr Mercedes - would have finished it on the plane, but I have a serious Breaking Bad addiction right now)

BOMB SHOW... if you can... watch the show CH:OS:EN. It is on Crackle or you can download it. I will tell you this... it may be the best thing I have ever watched TV wise... There are 3 seasons, 6 episodes each at 22mins long. I killed it in a night cause I could not stop... CANNOT wait for more!

Lookwhoitis
06-20-2014, 06:22 AM
Obviously Buzzfeed does not take as analytical an eye to their list. (we do that) I'm amused at all the folks who are put off by certain inclusions on the list, which is basically a fluff piece, when all someone did is probably pull up the amazon.com Stephen King catalog and make a list out if it.

Roden
06-20-2014, 07:01 AM
3. On Writing. This one was just so boring and pointless that I lay it aside as soon as I fully realized it wasn't going to get any better (about one third in)

Surprised you thought it was so pointless! The first half (autobiography part) was pretty interesting and the second half had a few good quotes and concepts. Though most I already felt I knew from my own experiences. I'm by no means a writer of fiction (at least in book form), but it did help me a little in regards to how I approach future writing tasks.

As for me, not many, I'm afraid. Only 11. I've read the Dark Tower series, It, Pet Semetary and On Writing. Next up is The Stand. I guess the rest of his books aren't as big?

Jean
06-20-2014, 12:20 PM
Sinserely... every time I read anything by King that is not fiction, I have to remind myself that it's the same author I adore and admire, the one who wrote It, The Stand, TDT and all the rest of them.

As for the length of King books, I believe The Stand is the longest! But there are quite a few big ones among others, too.

Merlin1958
06-20-2014, 05:38 PM
67 for me. With one obvious exception. I will not read "Faithful" even if he paid me.

Lookwhoitis
06-20-2014, 06:59 PM
I will not read "Faithful" even if he paid me.

:rofl:

Merlin1958
06-20-2014, 07:11 PM
I will not read "Faithful" even if he paid me.

:rofl:


LOL I'll burn it though, but only if I can wear surgical gloves. LOL

Jean
06-21-2014, 12:46 AM
if someone paid me for reading, I would read anything.

DoctorZaius
06-21-2014, 05:42 AM
I've read the entire cannon, except for Doctor Sleep and Mr. Mercedes, both of which are next on my list for the summer.

Brice
06-21-2014, 09:19 PM
71-I have not read Mr. Mercedes.

Girlystevedave
06-24-2014, 09:17 AM
42. I'm surprised there are that many that I haven't read.

:orely:

Heather19
06-24-2014, 02:49 PM
42. I'm surprised there are that many that I haven't read.

:orely:

Exactly the same for me. I always feel like I've read a lot of his books, but then I realize how many I haven't yet read.

dnemec
06-24-2014, 03:50 PM
Me too. Only 50. I'll have to work on that!

Mattrick
06-24-2014, 05:00 PM
Which ones couldn't you finish, Jean? And why?oh, but you know http://i91.photobucket.com/albums/k291/mishemplushem/Facilitation/bear_wink-1.gif (http://s91.photobucket.com/user/mishemplushem/media/Facilitation/bear_wink-1.gif.html)

1. The Running Man. Was reading it on the plane, and when the flight was over, there still were 20 or so pages left. At home, another two or three books were waiting for me, so I picked those up instead, to find out later that I irretrievably lost interest towards TRM.
2. The Green Mile. Was reading it in Paris, all the time dreaming to buy some other book instead. As soon as found another book in my favorite bookstore at St.Michel, abandoned TGM forever (more than halfway through)
3. On Writing. This one was just so boring and pointless that I lay it aside as soon as I fully realized it wasn't going to get any better (about one third in)

Did you not read the stuff in On Writing that was about King's accident? That stuff is amazing.

Brice
06-24-2014, 08:44 PM
There might be some interviews and articles I haven't read and also mr. mercedes, but I've probably read pretty much everything else.

Mattrick
06-25-2014, 01:31 AM
There's a lot in King's catelogue that doesn't interest me. That which does I'll and I haven't read I'll eventually get to. I've read so much King, and re-read so much King that I've needed a break the last few years. It doesn't help I was disappointed with the last two books of his I read which were Under The Dome and Desperation.

Jean
06-26-2014, 02:24 AM
Did you not read the stuff in On Writing that was about King's accident? That stuff is amazing.No, I never got as far as that part. I might go back to it.


It doesn't help I was disappointed with the last two books of his I read which were Under The Dome and Desperation. bears refuse to believe it

Jon
06-26-2014, 08:39 PM
42. I'm surprised there are that many that I haven't read.

:orely:


Relax... it's the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, The Universe, and Everything

Girlystevedave
06-27-2014, 05:07 AM
:lol:

True.


On the plus side, I feel a sense of relief knowing I still have a lot of King books to devour. :)

Merlin1958
06-27-2014, 11:01 AM
42. I'm surprised there are that many that I haven't read.

:orely:


Relax... it's the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, The Universe, and Everything


LOL Goodbye, and thanks for all the fish!!!

divemaster
07-14-2014, 07:58 AM
My score: "You have read 64 out of 72 on this list!"

Have not read:
The Plant
Faithful
Ur
Throttle
Mile 81 (never heard of it)
A Face in the Crowd (never heard of it)
In the Tall Grass (never heard of it)
Mr. Mercedes (I ordered this from Amazon a month ago but they said "shipping in November" :mad: )

frik
07-14-2014, 08:14 AM
Mr. Mercedes (I ordered this from Amazon a month ago but they said "shipping in November" :mad: )

Are you sure you didn't order REVIVAL?
That's the one for November.

sk

divemaster
07-14-2014, 08:21 AM
I pre-ordered both books at the same time quite a while ago, and evidently they plan on shipping both together. I think I pissed them off when I declined their offer to join Amazon Prime. They are holding Mr. Mercedes hostage to punish me!

I'm not that bent out of shape over it. I've got plenty of stuff to read and it's not like the story will go away or get stale.

Merlin1958
07-14-2014, 04:24 PM
My score: "You have read 64 out of 72 on this list!"

Have not read:
The Plant
Faithful
Ur
Throttle
Mile 81 (never heard of it)
A Face in the Crowd (never heard of it)
In the Tall Grass (never heard of it)
Mr. Mercedes (I ordered this from Amazon a month ago but they said "shipping in November" :mad: )


No one really needs to read "Faithful". It's communist propaganda I say!!!


:YYY::YYY::YYY:

Jean
07-23-2014, 07:55 AM
My score: "You have read 64 out of 72 on this list!"

Have not read:
The Plant
Faithful
Ur
Throttle
Mile 81 (never heard of it)
A Face in the Crowd (never heard of it)
In the Tall Grass (never heard of it)
Mr. Mercedes (I ordered this from Amazon a month ago but they said "shipping in November" :mad: )
both The Plant and In the Tall Grass are very good. Ur is nice, but nothing special. Mile 81 is so mediocre it's actually bad.

Garrell
07-23-2014, 11:47 AM
Go A's!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

mae
07-23-2014, 12:08 PM
Mile 81 (never heard of it)
A Face in the Crowd (never heard of it)
In the Tall Grass (never heard of it)

You should visit The Oracle more often.

divemaster
07-23-2014, 12:14 PM
"The Oracle"?

Never heard of it.

stroppygoblin
07-23-2014, 03:33 PM
The Oracle (http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/forumdisplay.php?6-The-Oracle)

divemaster
07-23-2014, 05:40 PM
I was teasing.

Jon
07-25-2014, 07:11 AM
The Oracle (http://www.thedarktower.org/palaver/forumdisplay.php?6-The-Oracle)

I actually clicked the link. I am going to bleach my hair now.

Jimimck
07-26-2014, 03:18 AM
Only 45 here. Got some gems still to read. Always nice to have things to look forward to.

rico567
10-24-2014, 09:01 AM
I scored 7.

There are a dozen others that I started to read, and lost interest. This is intended as no indictment of King. Look at just about any author, and they have an outstanding work, maybe two, and it drops of pretty precipitously from there.

{Discursiveness warning, at least somewhat off-topic}

Read Hemingway. After The Sun also Rises and a few short stories like The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, I'm done. Fitzgerald? Sorry, Gatsby is it for me. Joyce is known for Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake, which I find respectively unreadable and incomprehensible. But Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man are masterpieces. I could go on...

The idea that a great author is just going to write book after book that is of the same quality, and somehow should be of interest to everyone, is just nonsense. It somehow ties in with the notion that celebrities always have words of great wisdom to say on any subject, and we should listen to their opinions with hushed awe and make them our own. No, all they have is what is usually termed a "bully pulpit." What comes out of the mouths of celebrities is, by and large, of no more merit or note than that bandied about in truck stop restrooms or the checkout at the local Wal-Mart.

I will grant another category where one might claim books they really like. If someone is, let's say, a science fiction buff (which I am, sorta), then I might give someone like Larry Niven a half-dozen great books, while another part of me realizes it's probably no more than two or three. Even giants I grew up on and never out of, like Robert A. Heinlein don't stand up to close scrutiny. Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, and Moon is a Harsh Mistress...that's about it. I've never thought his future history writing was all that great.
In the category of post-apocalyptic fiction, my favorite is Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s A Canticle for Liebowitz. Hands down. Better than King, Hoban, anybody. But as far as I know, everything else Miller ever wrote was pretty much embarrassing.
Talent is what it is, but it isn't necessarily consistent.

jhanic
10-24-2014, 11:21 AM
I scored 7.

There are a dozen others that I started to read, and lost interest. This is intended as no indictment of King. Look at just about any author, and they have an outstanding work, maybe two, and it drops of pretty precipitously from there.

{Discursiveness warning, at least somewhat off-topic}

Read Hemingway. After The Sun also Rises and a few short stories like The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, I'm done. Fitzgerald? Sorry, Gatsby is it for me. Joyce is known for Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake, which I find respectively unreadable and incomprehensible. But Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man are masterpieces. I could go on...

The idea that a great author is just going to write book after book that is of the same quality, and somehow should be of interest to everyone, is just nonsense. It somehow ties in with the notion that celebrities always have words of great wisdom to say on any subject, and we should listen to their opinions with hushed awe and make them our own. No, all they have is what is usually termed a "bully pulpit." What comes out of the mouths of celebrities is, by and large, of no more merit or note than that bandied about in truck stop restrooms or the checkout at the local Wal-Mart.

I will grant another category where one might claim books they really like. If someone is, let's say, a science fiction buff (which I am, sorta), then I might give someone like Larry Niven a half-dozen great books, while another part of me realizes it's probably no more than two or three. Even giants I grew up on and never out of, like Robert A. Heinlein don't stand up to close scrutiny. Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, and Moon is a Harsh Mistress...that's about it. I've never thought his future history writing was all that great.
In the category of post-apocalyptic fiction, my favorite is Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s A Canticle for Liebowitz. Hands down. Better than King, Hoban, anybody. But as far as I know, everything else Miller ever wrote was pretty much embarrassing.
Talent is what it is, but it isn't necessarily consistent.

What I find interesting is that everyone has their own favorite books; seldom are they the same ones, though. For me, the best Heinlein is Time Enough for Love, which you don't even mention. Just saying.

John

Cordial Jim
10-24-2014, 03:28 PM
55

"Bow down to the ultimate Stephen King addict. Youíve read almost everything that heís written, and thatís no easy feat. Over the years, Stephen King has delighted you, made you laugh, and kept you up at night. There are very few other authors for which you could say the same."

rico567
10-30-2014, 08:49 AM
I scored 7.

There are a dozen others that I started to read, and lost interest. This is intended as no indictment of King. Look at just about any author, and they have an outstanding work, maybe two, and it drops of pretty precipitously from there.

{Discursiveness warning, at least somewhat off-topic}

Read Hemingway. After The Sun also Rises and a few short stories like The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, I'm done. Fitzgerald? Sorry, Gatsby is it for me. Joyce is known for Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake, which I find respectively unreadable and incomprehensible. But Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man are masterpieces. I could go on...

The idea that a great author is just going to write book after book that is of the same quality, and somehow should be of interest to everyone, is just nonsense. It somehow ties in with the notion that celebrities always have words of great wisdom to say on any subject, and we should listen to their opinions with hushed awe and make them our own. No, all they have is what is usually termed a "bully pulpit." What comes out of the mouths of celebrities is, by and large, of no more merit or note than that bandied about in truck stop restrooms or the checkout at the local Wal-Mart.

I will grant another category where one might claim books they really like. If someone is, let's say, a science fiction buff (which I am, sorta), then I might give someone like Larry Niven a half-dozen great books, while another part of me realizes it's probably no more than two or three. Even giants I grew up on and never out of, like Robert A. Heinlein don't stand up to close scrutiny. Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, and Moon is a Harsh Mistress...that's about it. I've never thought his future history writing was all that great.
In the category of post-apocalyptic fiction, my favorite is Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s A Canticle for Liebowitz. Hands down. Better than King, Hoban, anybody. But as far as I know, everything else Miller ever wrote was pretty much embarrassing.
Talent is what it is, but it isn't necessarily consistent.

What I find interesting is that everyone has their own favorite books; seldom are they the same ones, though. For me, the best Heinlein is Time Enough for Love, which you don't even mention. Just saying.

John

I understand your point. To me, the later books (Time enough for Love, Cat Who Walks Through Walls, Job, etc.) might as well be by another author altogether.

mvbma
04-29-2015, 11:09 AM
Only 20!
haha

Merlin1958
05-04-2015, 07:06 PM
I scored 7.

There are a dozen others that I started to read, and lost interest. This is intended as no indictment of King. Look at just about any author, and they have an outstanding work, maybe two, and it drops of pretty precipitously from there.

{Discursiveness warning, at least somewhat off-topic}

Read Hemingway. After The Sun also Rises and a few short stories like The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, I'm done. Fitzgerald? Sorry, Gatsby is it for me. Joyce is known for Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake, which I find respectively unreadable and incomprehensible. But Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man are masterpieces. I could go on...

The idea that a great author is just going to write book after book that is of the same quality, and somehow should be of interest to everyone, is just nonsense. It somehow ties in with the notion that celebrities always have words of great wisdom to say on any subject, and we should listen to their opinions with hushed awe and make them our own. No, all they have is what is usually termed a "bully pulpit." What comes out of the mouths of celebrities is, by and large, of no more merit or note than that bandied about in truck stop restrooms or the checkout at the local Wal-Mart.

I will grant another category where one might claim books they really like. If someone is, let's say, a science fiction buff (which I am, sorta), then I might give someone like Larry Niven a half-dozen great books, while another part of me realizes it's probably no more than two or three. Even giants I grew up on and never out of, like Robert A. Heinlein don't stand up to close scrutiny. Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, and Moon is a Harsh Mistress...that's about it. I've never thought his future history writing was all that great.
In the category of post-apocalyptic fiction, my favorite is Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s A Canticle for Liebowitz. Hands down. Better than King, Hoban, anybody. But as far as I know, everything else Miller ever wrote was pretty much embarrassing.
Talent is what it is, but it isn't necessarily consistent.

You're either a "critic" or an "Academia" enthusiast. In either case, who really cares what you think? People read what they like and they like, Stephen King very much. He may not now, be considered on a par with, Edgar Allen Poe or H.P. Lovecraft, but only academians will make that call at some time in the distant future. With no real, tangible reason, to boot. Shakespeare, was a schmuck in his day and wrote in order to eat. Who are you to pass judgement? Popularity is the only ruler you honestly have to measure their respective works and you sort of folks routinely ignore that fact.

Thanks for playing!!!

killjoy72
05-05-2015, 06:02 AM
48... and I probably will never read Faithful.

Girlystevedave
05-05-2015, 11:18 AM
42. I'm surprised there are that many that I haven't read.

:orely:

Okay, I'm up to 45 now. Only 27 to go! :lol:

Theli
05-05-2015, 08:35 PM
I scored 7.

There are a dozen others that I started to read, and lost interest. This is intended as no indictment of King. Look at just about any author, and they have an outstanding work, maybe two, and it drops of pretty precipitously from there.

{Discursiveness warning, at least somewhat off-topic}

Read Hemingway. After The Sun also Rises and a few short stories like The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, I'm done. Fitzgerald? Sorry, Gatsby is it for me. Joyce is known for Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake, which I find respectively unreadable and incomprehensible. But Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man are masterpieces. I could go on...

The idea that a great author is just going to write book after book that is of the same quality, and somehow should be of interest to everyone, is just nonsense. It somehow ties in with the notion that celebrities always have words of great wisdom to say on any subject, and we should listen to their opinions with hushed awe and make them our own. No, all they have is what is usually termed a "bully pulpit." What comes out of the mouths of celebrities is, by and large, of no more merit or note than that bandied about in truck stop restrooms or the checkout at the local Wal-Mart.

I will grant another category where one might claim books they really like. If someone is, let's say, a science fiction buff (which I am, sorta), then I might give someone like Larry Niven a half-dozen great books, while another part of me realizes it's probably no more than two or three. Even giants I grew up on and never out of, like Robert A. Heinlein don't stand up to close scrutiny. Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, and Moon is a Harsh Mistress...that's about it. I've never thought his future history writing was all that great.
In the category of post-apocalyptic fiction, my favorite is Walter M. Miller, Jr.'s A Canticle for Liebowitz. Hands down. Better than King, Hoban, anybody. But as far as I know, everything else Miller ever wrote was pretty much embarrassing.
Talent is what it is, but it isn't necessarily consistent.

You're either a "critic" or an "Academia" enthusiast. In either case, who really cares what you think? People read what they like and they like, Stephen King very much. He may not now, be considered on a par with, Edgar Allen Poe or H.P. Lovecraft, but only academians will make that call at some time in the distant future. With no real, tangible reason, to boot. Shakespeare, was a schmuck in his day and wrote in order to eat. Who are you to pass judgement? Popularity is the only ruler you honestly have to measure their respective works and you sort of folks routinely ignore that fact.

Thanks for playing!!!

I want to say, that despite how much I like his works and innovations, Lovecraft was not a stellar writer. His compatriot Robert E. Howard overshadows him in the craft of storytelling, as does King.

taggs7475
05-15-2015, 10:18 AM
31 for me and just started the Talisman

Xerrand
06-18-2015, 04:05 AM
Not even joking around here.....I got 19 :|

amd013
07-29-2015, 11:24 AM
I guess it depends on how you interpret the list. Its either 59 or 65 for me.

I have read "Riding the Bullet" as part of Everything is Eventual, but not the stand alone book, which has a lot of content not in the collection.
I have also listened to audio versions of UR, Throttle, Mile 81, A face in the Crowd, In the Tall Grass, but have never read them.

I'm reading them (generally) in order. I am up to 11/22/63, and have read everything prior to this except The Plant, Faithful and On Writing. I also skipped ahead and have already read Joyland.

Mike

wordslingers
07-30-2015, 07:25 AM
I got 43! I read about 25 of them in one year in 2012, but I've slowed down since then because I don't want to have read everything just yet, I like knowing I've got a handful waiting for me. :D

Mister_Oy
11-16-2015, 11:03 AM
Only 50 - but many of those more than once.

Dark Tower series 5 times.

jsmcmullen92
11-19-2015, 08:51 AM
Is there any in print versions of In the Tall Grass and Throttle (not eBook or audio)?

jhanic
11-19-2015, 06:30 PM
Throttle was printed in the He Is Legend anthology. As far as I know, In the Tall Grass was never printed on paper.

John

Lurker
11-19-2015, 08:40 PM
"In The Tall Grass" was a two part story in the June/July and August/September 2012 issues of Esquire.

jhanic
11-20-2015, 04:51 AM
"In The Tall Grass" was a two part story in the June/July and August/September 2012 issues of Esquire.

I knew that! I just forgot! Senior moment again!

John

BROWNINGS CHILDE
11-21-2015, 02:39 PM
63.

Haven't read ALL of Night Shift which is my glaring omission.
Then:
In the Tall Grass.
Throttle
Faithful
The Plant (Isn't this incomplete?)
Colorado Kid (My only S/L which is why I haven't read it)
UR
Mile 81
King A Face in the Crowd (Never heard of this)

I guess my score will improve after I read Bazaar of Bad Dreams.

Walter O Dim
08-08-2016, 11:29 AM
I only got 26. There's some hard-core fans here. The problem I have is never knowing which King book to read next.

Ebdim9th
09-18-2016, 09:14 AM
I read 64 on the list, but it's 66 that I can think of because From A Buick 8 and The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon were not on the list. But, I can't remember, was Roadwork on the list?

Little_Monster_Gage
01-19-2017, 06:11 AM
On the quiz I've only read 14 of the listed books but like someone mentioned in an above thread that The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon was not listed and given the year the quiz was made neither was Finder's Keepers (which I have read). So that brings my grand total to 16, I'm getting there.

I've been a fan of King's for as long as I could remember, mainly due to the fact that I watched a lot of his movies when I was younger. When I was little I thought that Stephen King only made movies because his name was usually on the front of the video boxes ex: Stephen King's Pet Semetary comes to mind. But don't judge me too harshly though, I was like 5 or younger. I'm a late bloomer when it comes to reading & collecting Stephen King books. When I started to graduate from reading Junior Novilizations & YA books and moving onto bigger and more difficult books, King was my first choice to read. My mom told me to hold off from reading him because she said he was probably a bit too difficult for me to understand at the young age of 12. So I put him off for the time being, but determined to return one day and read at least 1 of his books. As I entered high school, I started to notice changes in my body, voice, and thought process. I thought I was ready to be able to tackle some Stephen King now, but the funny thing about high school is the teachers make sure you have no time to enjoy yourself. I forgot what reading for was because my English teachers would force us to read books none of us were interested in. But a funny thing happened, I got introduced to Edgar Allen Poe, and fell in love with his dark twisted tales. So I thought I was ready to tackle Stephen King, I went to the bookstore by my house, and bought a hardcover copy of Cell and started reading. But I couldn't get through it, I got bored, and I expected things to happen and when they didn't I was disappointed. So that again deterred me from reading King for sometime. It wasn't until I entered community college and started talking to people from other parts of the county and listening to them talk about books they've read and authors they love, did I notice King was mentioned more then once. There were fans of his books in my life and they begged me to start reading King, which I did on their behalf, so at the age of 18 or 19 my first book I ever finished of his was "Dreamcatcher" and it holds a sweet spot in my heart. It's my first and as they say you always remember your first. So from that moment on I became one of his constant reader's.

kaufen
03-02-2017, 07:36 AM
Only 45 here. Got some gems still to read.