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View Full Version : Can I read The Wind right after Wizard and Glass ?



SlowMutant
04-01-2012, 12:16 PM
Hi all,

I'm relatively new to the Dark Tower.
As Wikipedia says the 8th book plays between the fourth and fifth book and it happens to be that I was just near the end of book four when I heard about The Wind Through The Keyhole. - I think certain people arround here call that Ka, right ? ;)

So would it be wise to read it right after Wizard and Glass which I am about to finish ?

Thanks!

mae
04-01-2012, 12:22 PM
Hi and welcome to the forums!

Personally I'd read the books in order they were written and published.

Merlin1958
04-01-2012, 06:47 PM
Hi all,

I'm relatively new to the Dark Tower.
As Wikipedia says the 8th book plays between the fourth and fifth book and it happens to be that I was just near the end of book four when I heard about The Wind Through The Keyhole. - I think certain people arround here call that Ka, right ? ;)

So would it be wise to read it right after Wizard and Glass which I am about to finish ?

Thanks!

Well, I thoroughly see Pablo's point, but if I were reading it for the first time, I think I would want to read TWTTKH before Wolves of the Calla. However, that's just me. To each his own, right?

Brainslinger
04-06-2012, 12:20 AM
Well, I thoroughly see Pablo's point, but if I were reading it for the first time, I think I would want to read TWTTKH before Wolves of the Calla. However, that's just me. To each his own, right?

I think it could be interesting from an experimental point of view. One of the things that worries me a little about the positioning of Wind... is will it be jarring what with chronologically later books not referencing that material, at all. I'm thinking mainly of the start of Wolves of the Calla here where you get the impression the Ka-tet have gone through a long period of nothing much happening since leaving the Crystal palace. Then again, if it's mainly back-story stuff, maybe nothing much did happen for them, and we do know that Roland told them other stories off-stage so to speak from a comment made in Song of Susannah concerning the Little Doctors and Walking waters... (or something like that.)

It will be interesting to see how a first time reader, reading these events chronologically, will take the later books.

While I don't think it matters too much I'm with Merlin. I say go for it. Not just because I'm just trying to use you as an experimental subject, mind. I do genuinely think it's a good opportunity to catch all the events in the order in which they happened.

BROWNINGS CHILDE
04-06-2012, 02:52 AM
I paused on my reread of the DT series last year after WaG in anticipation of TWTTK coming this year for just this purpose.

Merlin1958
04-06-2012, 05:21 PM
Each point is relevant. Matter of opinion and preference IMHO. Equal arguments for either way I'd say.................


Enjoy the "Journey" is probably the most important thing!!!!

woodpryan
04-12-2012, 06:30 PM
Stephen King says that this book falls between Wizard and Glass and The Wolves of the Calla. I really don't understand why there is even a debate about this. It seems pretty logical that The Wind Through the Keyhole should be read after Wizard and Glass.

harrison ryan
04-12-2012, 06:37 PM
It doesn't seem quite as cut and dry to me...although I haven't read Wind yet, I can see how there might be differences in tone and style that would make it better as a capper to the series--kind of a "lost tale." From what I gather, the book centers around another long reminiscence, and after the long tale of nostalgia that is W&G, some readers may be ready for the ka-tet to hit the road again at that point, instead of sitting down for another campfire story. I know I was!

Merlin1958
04-12-2012, 11:11 PM
It doesn't seem quite as cut and dry to me...although I haven't read Wind yet, I can see how there might be differences in tone and style that would make it better as a capper to the series--kind of a "lost tale." From what I gather, the book centers around another long reminiscence, and after the long tale of nostalgia that is W&G, some readers may be ready for the ka-tet to hit the road again at that point, instead of sitting down for another campfire story. I know I was!

Not trying to argue with ya at all, but from what I understand (I have yet to read it as well) King's intention with regard to style and content is to make up for the timeline gap between DT IV and V. So I guess he is "Ret-Conning" to an extent. Again FWIW I see the points both ways. Matter of opinion IMHO

Jean
04-13-2012, 12:33 AM
It doesn't seem quite as cut and dry to me...although I haven't read Wind yet, I can see how there might be differences in tone and style that would make it better as a capper to the series--kind of a "lost tale." From what I gather, the book centers around another long reminiscence, and after the long tale of nostalgia that is W&G, some readers may be ready for the ka-tet to hit the road again at that point, instead of sitting down for another campfire story. I know I was!that's what I think, too

Brice
04-13-2012, 03:47 AM
No!

harrison ryan
04-13-2012, 02:17 PM
Not trying to argue with ya at all...

Merlin, how dare you, sir???? (http://www.hark.com/clips/jlkbpbcrgk-how-dare-you-sir)

Merlin1958
04-13-2012, 06:45 PM
Not trying to argue with ya at all...

Merlin, how dare you, sir???? (http://www.hark.com/clips/jlkbpbcrgk-how-dare-you-sir)

Oh, wise-guy, eh????? LOL LOL LOL

harrison ryan
04-13-2012, 06:48 PM
Not trying to argue with ya at all...

Merlin, how dare you, sir???? (http://www.hark.com/clips/jlkbpbcrgk-how-dare-you-sir)

Oh, wise-guy, eh????? LOL LOL LOL

What's strange is that I was looking for a different audio clip altogether and stumbled on that one from "Ryan Harrison" in about 30 seconds...

biomieg
04-13-2012, 11:47 PM
It doesn't seem quite as cut and dry to me...although I haven't read Wind yet, I can see how there might be differences in tone and style that would make it better as a capper to the series--kind of a "lost tale." From what I gather, the book centers around another long reminiscence, and after the long tale of nostalgia that is W&G, some readers may be ready for the ka-tet to hit the road again at that point, instead of sitting down for another campfire story. I know I was!that's what I think, too

I read TWTTKH after finishing the other books (of course, since I have been reading the DT books one by one since 1988 or 1989) and for me, having read the whole tale first adds to the reading experience of TWTTKH. It's a kind of 'reverse nostalgia/melancholy' because you know what will happen in their future whereas the ka-tet doesn't. It adds a layer of emotion that you'd miss if you read TWTTKH between DTIV and DTV.

harrison ryan
04-14-2012, 09:29 AM
That's an excellent point, MichaŽl. I have a feeling that will be my experience when I get to read it in...ten days!

Jean
04-14-2012, 09:32 AM
excellent point indeed, and makes me want to read it NOW

which I won't be able to do at least till June, by which time I hope someone will bring it from some country

BigSchu22
04-18-2012, 06:40 AM
Having experienced this with OSC's Enderverse/Shadow Series, I found it helpful to read them in published order as I could see the different connections to future events, or past events. I also had a greater familiarity with the universe as a whole, so it was much easier to get into the story.

Although, a good point was brought up about the tone. I could definitely feel a difference in tone and writing style compared to OSC's earlier books and it was a bit jarring. I just started a re-read of the DT series and I forgot how different the first book is from even the second, as far as tone and style. Since I've already read all the DT books, I'll probably read TWTTKH immediately after WandG, but I am already familiar with all the original books, so it's tough to say. I guess I would lean toward reading in published order.

Another thing I noticed upon re-reading the whole DT series, I appreciate the small references to things in Roland's past that appear throughout the revised edition of The Gunslinger. When i first started the DT series, I had no clue what he was talking about and the references were completely lost on me, and subsequently forgotten.

cupofcoffee
05-01-2012, 09:24 AM
I think it works in both places, either after finishing the main series or between Wizard and Glass and Wolves of the Calla. I found it to be an unexpectedly good bridge between the two halves of the series, since the narrative is stylistically similar to the first three books. It's very fast-paced, compact, and has almost none of the despair and melancholy that peppers the final three books in the seriesóand it's focused on the metaphysical aspects of storytelling and the power of fiction itself, which is more like books five through seven.

But as good a bridge as it is, and as good idea as I think it was to set it between Wizard and Glass and Wolves of the Calla, I'm glad I had already finished the series when it came out. Wind Through the Keyhole ends on probably the most hopeful note of any of the books in the series, and it was refreshing to visit a more youthful, adventurous version of Mid-World after learning, in the last book, that...

Roland is trapped in the Tower's endless cycle. It definitely feels like a "lost tale" or B-side of sorts, and it gives the impression that even though Roland is damned to repeat his quest forever, there's still more to learn about his life in Mid-World. Wind Through the Keyhole as a whole is very heartwarming, but I think a lot of it's due to the feeling of hope it leaves Stephen King's "Constant Reader" with, even after s/he has finished the main series and learned the truth about Roland's quest.

CyberGhostface
05-19-2012, 09:41 AM
My only issue is that the reader, if they are reading the series with this in between 4 and 5, might get restless with yet another "Roland tells the Ka-tet a story" tale after Wizard and Glass, especially one that has no real bearing on the rest of the series and won't enjoy it as much.

But rereading it I would probably read it like that.

Merlin1958
05-19-2012, 01:11 PM
My only issue is that the reader, if they are reading the series with this in between 4 and 5, might get restless with yet another "Roland tells the Ka-tet a story" tale after Wizard and Glass, especially one that has no real bearing on the rest of the series and won't enjoy it as much.

But rereading it I would probably read it like that.

Actually, that's a very good point!!! I forget how difficult it was to slog through The Mejis part in W&G!!! I revise my recommendation for this reason!!!

Roland of Gilead 33
05-19-2012, 11:30 PM
yes W&G did drag on in some areas. but that doesn't mean it wasn't a good book. or instead of reading the books back to back one right after another. you could take a break from wizard & Glass & than i dunno at some point read the new one than read "wolves of calla' and so on.

i just bought this the other day. for $15 at "Sam's Club" i just haven't started it yet. is it any good?

also in the beginging of the book 'King" pretty much says in it that it like someone here said takes place after the end of w&g. by the looks of it the 1st say 30 pages are normal time than the story starts. like it did in W&G

Merlin1958
05-20-2012, 07:31 AM
yes W&G did drag on in some areas. but that doesn't mean it wasn't a good book. or instead of reading the books back to back one right after another. you could take a break from wizard & Glass & than i dunno at some point read the new one than read "wolves of calla' and so on.

i just bought this the other day. for $15 at "Sam's Club" i just haven't started it yet. is it any good?

also in the beginging of the book 'King" pretty much says in it that it like someone here said takes place after the end of w&g. by the looks of it the 1st say 30 pages are normal time than the story starts. like it did in W&G

Didn't mean to sound like I didn't enjoy the book, I did. Like you say for me, the first time, it dragged a bit. You have to understand I was one of those folks that began reading TDT back in the '80's. There were literally "Years" between books and I was anxious to get to the Tower!!!!! Or at least continue on that storyline. It drove me nuts!!!! Cause I knew there were years until the next installment!!! LOL

WeDealInLead
05-20-2012, 09:11 AM
yes W&G did drag on in some areas. but that doesn't mean it wasn't a good book. or instead of reading the books back to back one right after another. you could take a break from wizard & Glass & than i dunno at some point read the new one than read "wolves of calla' and so on.

i just bought this the other day. for $15 at "Sam's Club" i just haven't started it yet. is it any good?

also in the beginging of the book 'King" pretty much says in it that it like someone here said takes place after the end of w&g. by the looks of it the 1st say 30 pages are normal time than the story starts. like it did in W&G

Have you read all the books yet? I'd be mad at King if the publishing order was Wizard and then Wind. It does absolutely nothing to move the plot. Basically, Roland is telling a story to pass some time. I mean, if you prefer to read the story in the chronological/correct timeline order, that's fine and your prerogative but then you might as well read the Mejis parts from Wizard first, then Little Sisters, then The Gunslinger, Drawing, Waste Lands followed by non-Mejis/childhood parts of Wizard. That'd be the correct time line, more or less. Or just read them in the published order.

CyberGhostface
05-20-2012, 11:38 AM
I mean, if you prefer to read the story in the chronological/correct timeline order, that's fine and your prerogative but then you might as well read the Mejis parts from Wizard first, then Little Sisters, then The Gunslinger, Drawing, Waste Lands followed by non-Mejis/childhood parts of Wizard. That'd be the correct time line, more or less. Or just read them in the published order.

It still takes place between 4 and 5 -- Roland and the Ka-tet have left the Emerald Castle, etc and are on their way to the Callas. It's written as part of the series proper even if it doesn't advance the main plot. King himself said it's intended to be read between the two and bridge the gap. Little Sisters of Eluria was its own thing taking place outside of the series.

Now again I wouldn't necessarily recommend reading it that way the first time around as some may grow impatient with the bulk of the novel being a largely unrelated story and wanting to get back into the main plot but it's not the same thing as reading W&G first as that would be reading what King intended to be the fourth part of the series before the first.

Brainslinger
05-20-2012, 01:26 PM
I suppose one difference with Wizard... is that The Wind... does seem to move along quicker. But yes, I think yet another back-story could be an issue for some readers. And then in Wolves of the Calla there was another back story if we include Callahan's and the old man's stories but they're shorter and of a very different kind so the experience is probably quite different.

Merlin1958
05-20-2012, 04:51 PM
I suppose one difference with Wizard... is that The Wind... does seem to move along quicker. But yes, I think yet another back-story could be an issue for some readers. And then in Wolves of the Calla there was another back story if we include Callahan's and the old man's stories but they're shorter and of a very different kind so the experience is probably quite different.

That's very true!!! Now I'm back on the fence!!! LOL

WeDealinlead: It's true TWTTKH does little to further the main story, but it does offer some very interesting glimpses into Mid-World, The Starkblast (which I found particularly interesting), The Shapeshifter's and another level to MIB to name a few. Plus some really cool creatures and I have not yet quite finished it!!! Given that there a "Back Stories in (now) 3 consecutive volumes perhaps it truly should be read (for the first time) in the Authors recommended order. Or maybe not!!! LOL

WeDealInLead
05-21-2012, 06:52 AM
I think Michael's post was spot on. Publishing order > anything else.

mae
05-21-2012, 10:43 AM
Absolutely publishing order. Nothing else makes sense. Just like with anything, really. Just because something takes place earlier in the chronology doesn't mean anything. It was created later.

Dan
05-21-2012, 10:47 AM
Absolutely publishing order. Nothing else makes sense. Just like with anything, really. Just because something takes place earlier in the chronology doesn't mean anything. It was created later.

I think this sums up what I was thinking.

Brice
05-21-2012, 06:56 PM
Hmm...I've read them in publishing order, but I see nothing wrong with mixing it up a bit. It gives new perspectives.

Merlin1958
05-21-2012, 10:07 PM
Absolutely publishing order. Nothing else makes sense. Just like with anything, really. Just because something takes place earlier in the chronology doesn't mean anything. It was created later.

Well, I would think that for most of us here it's a "Moot" point, right? This thread is really for newcomers and first time readers. However, it's fun to speculate!!!

Edit: To clarify, it's kinda hard to imagine reading it in any other fashion than you already did. As much as you may think you can there will always be a little bias mixed in. It's human nature. Make sense?

Random321321
05-22-2012, 09:28 AM
I would extend the publishing order to reading the original Gunslinger first, and only reading the revised Gunslinger after W&G, if you must read it at all. (I think it's vastly inferior).

Roland of Gilead 33
05-23-2012, 10:33 PM
actually i haven't really read anything for awhile. but i am somewhere in 'The Wolves of Calla' i forget where? i think it was during "Callhan's storyline.

or however ya he spell his name? as you said to each their own i guess. honestly i dunno what i'd going to do first finish the series the way it was written. or read it as King suggested pretty much & read the new one after W&G

CyberGhostface
05-24-2012, 04:20 PM
This kind of reminds me about the "Narnia" debate about whether or not you should read the books in publishing order (with "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" being the first one) or in chronological order (starting with "The Magician's Nephew"). I know Lewis wrote in a letter that he preferred the latter.

zerodinh
06-12-2012, 06:39 PM
Of all points and reasons wether to read as 4.5 or 8 the one that would mater most to me are the endings. To keep it as simple as possible so no spoiler is needed, "Wind's" ending is more complete and for me it is the best way to end this series (for now of cousre, because I will love any other glimpses King want's to give us into Roland's story) But as I said, For me ending it with those final lines in WTTK needed to be after those final words in DT7. That and 2 campfire stories in a row might not be as fun as getting right into "Wolves."

twice
09-17-2013, 04:11 PM
Stephen King says that this book falls between Wizard and Glass and The Wolves of the Calla. I really don't understand why there is even a debate about this. It seems pretty logical that The Wind Through the Keyhole should be read after Wizard and Glass.

Absolutely. Going forward I wouldn't read the books in any other order

ChristineB
09-17-2013, 06:48 PM
I have to say, for the very first reading of the series I would suggest chronological order... and by that I mean all his books in that order, yes I know that is a daunting task but really there are so many tie ins that without ready Salem's lot before you hit Wolves of the Calla Callahan is no one special and the list goes on.

Now once you have read them all in chronological order I suggest you read TDT with Wind in the order SK says it belongs, after Wizards. Just my suggestion.

mattgreenbean
09-18-2013, 05:30 AM
I have to say, for the very first reading of the series I would suggest chronological order... and by that I mean all his books in that order, yes I know that is a daunting task but really there are so many tie ins that without ready Salem's lot before you hit Wolves of the Calla Callahan is no one special and the list goes on.

Now once you have read them all in chronological order I suggest you read TDT with Wind in the order SK says it belongs, after Wizards. Just my suggestion.

Good point, what would be the order to read all DT related books with the actual DT books? Which ones are neccesary to the DT story? Salem's Lot, Low Men in Yellow Coats, etc...

Bev Vincent
09-18-2013, 06:04 AM
The best experience would be to read them in order of publication. Certain DT concepts were introduced in non-DT books before they entered the series. The Crimson King debuted in Insomnia and the concept of Breakers was explained in Black House. Which ones are necessary? At a minimum: 'Salem's Lot, "Low Men in Yellow Coats," Insomnia, Black House, "Everythings Eventual"

Here's my list of the principle books and stories with strong (or strong-ish) DT connections (from The Dark Tower Companion)


‘Salem’s Lot
The Stand
The Talisman
Skeleton Crew (The Mist, Mrs. Todd's Shortcut)
It
The Eyes of the Dragon
Insomnia
Rose Madder
Desperation
The Regulators
Bag of Bones
Hearts in Atlantis
The Plant
Black House
From a Buick 8
Everything’s Eventual (Little Sisters of Eluria and the title story)
The Colorado Kid
Ur
Mile 81

Merlin1958
09-18-2013, 04:49 PM
I strongly feel that the books (all) should be read in the order of publication in order to get the full effect. That being said, you can absolutely read TWTTKH between TDTIV and V no problem. It's best to try to experience the "mystery" most of us did in the publishing/writing journey IMHO

jhanic
09-19-2013, 03:57 AM
I strongly feel that the books (all) should be read in the order of publication in order to get the full effect. That being said, you can absolutely read TWTTKH between TDTIV and V no problem. It's best to try to experience the "mystery" most of us did in the publishing/writing journey IMHO

That's just the way I feel also.

John

Merlin1958
09-20-2013, 04:17 PM
I strongly feel that the books (all) should be read in the order of publication in order to get the full effect. That being said, you can absolutely read TWTTKH between TDTIV and V no problem. It's best to try to experience the "mystery" most of us did in the publishing/writing journey IMHO

That's just the way I feel also.

John

Thanks, and if you can stretch it out over 25+ years you will really enjoy the original journey!! LOL LOL

jhanic
09-20-2013, 05:10 PM
That's what I did!

John

Ross
04-22-2015, 05:33 AM
I just finished Wizard the other day. While waiting for Wind to arrive I re-read The Gunslinger on Monday night and started Wind last night. I am hoping to finish Wind by the weekend and hopefully start Wolves by Saturday afternoon. After seeing all the posts in this thread I kind of wish I saw this discussion before starting or I would have gone with Wolves next and read them in published order. In any event, my goal is to continue reading daily and get through the entire series as if it were one long book (The I am going to read the Stand again as its been years since I read it). My hope is that doing this will enable me to keep everything as fresh as possible so that I can recall previous books (stories), characters, etc easily. I cant even imagine what some of you went through that read these books as they were published, I would have gone crazy waiting years for the next books to come out.

Johnny Alien
04-22-2015, 06:11 AM
I prefer Wind to go where King intended it story-wise which is 4.5. I think it really makes it flow better. He wrote it afterwards but intended it to be after Wizard story wise. I think you did the right thing but that is just my opinion.

craigobau
04-22-2015, 06:38 AM
I also recently finished reading Wizard and Glass (for the first time) and then ploughed straight into Wind and thought the transition from one to the other made perfect sense (without any knowledge of what's to come in books 5, 6 and 7).

I've taken a break from the series (now reading Dreamcatcher, which is proving to be much better so far than expected based upon general opinion of this book), purely for the reason that I don't want the story to end as the DT books so far have created such rich characters and environments.

So, once I've finished Dreamcatcher, I think I might re-read Salem's Lot, then Black House, and then plough on with Wolves of Calla.

Question for anyone - do you think it would be worthwhile re-reading The Talisman before reading Black House?

Thanks.

chucknbuck
04-24-2015, 07:09 AM
I'm a proponent of reading it in publishing order. There was something intangible missing from the wind through the keyhole. The spirit or feel of the book was different. I like it ok, and it is required reading for any DT fan, but I feel it might disrupt the mood or feeling of the original series. It is certainly subjective.

Merlin1958
04-27-2015, 10:04 AM
I'm a proponent of reading it in publishing order. There was something intangible missing from the wind through the keyhole. The spirit or feel of the book was different. I like it ok, and it is required reading for any DT fan, but I feel it might disrupt the mood or feeling of the original series. It is certainly subjective.

I know, King intends it as 4.5, but as I recall when you finish TDT IV you should be dieing to get back to the main story and it rolls rather fluidly from there until the end. In my mind, you aren't missing anything waiting until after finishing the original series to read WTTKH. In fact, it's a rather nice epilog of sorts. IMHO Now, if you are just starting out, LSOE is a really good starting point before TDT I.

frik
04-27-2015, 11:51 AM
Question for anyone - do you think it would be worthwhile re-reading The Talisman before reading Black House? Thanks.

No. The books are completely different and re-reading The Talisman doesn't add much (anything?!) to the reading of Black House.

sk

Jon
05-08-2015, 12:20 AM
Hey...King had me running through all kinds of orders of books since the early 80's. I waited 22 0r 23 years for a Dt book. I even read the original Gunslinger. I tell you; just read DT 1-7 in order and you will be ok. If you read ANY King book in between you will be ok. If you read the Black House before The Talisman you will be ok and vice versa. If you read Desperation before you read The Regulators you are ok. The wind thoh the keyhole before any of the others...you are ok.

j-buck
07-17-2015, 03:45 PM
I was concerned that it would give away things in later books, but it didn't. I read it between Wizard and Wolves, and I think it does a good job serving as a bridge between those books. I would read it where King set it chronologically instead of treating it like an outlier.

Xerrand
07-21-2015, 09:43 AM
I actually read it long after I had finished all the main seven books. It was a great thing to have another DT book to be able to read! I hope he writes more soon. You can read it directly after WAG without any worry of spoilers.

craigobau
07-22-2015, 12:10 AM
I read WttK after W&G and before WotC. The only downside of that approach is that each those three stories include substantial back stories so you don't make a lot of progress in the overall journey of our ka-tet to the DT.

BTW, just finished WoTC and thought it was the best of the series so far.

eddietrooper
01-10-2017, 03:29 PM
I read it after volume VII. It doesn't really matter if tou read it before or after the other books. The story (and the story within the story) that is told is not relevant for the main argument of the series.

Hunchback Jack
07-23-2017, 08:24 AM
I think you can certainly read it after Wizard and Glass. In fact, while I was reading it, I was impressed at how King hinted at elements of the later books without spoiling them. While it may slow down the series a bit to have two flashback novels back to back, I think Keyhole does form a nice connecting work between volumes 4 and 5.